Category Archives: History

Wait…what did they eat? The History of Food

Wait…what did they eat? The History of Food

What You Never Knew About Fingers Forks and Chopsticks What You Never Knew About Fingers, Forks and Chopsticks takes you on a tour of food and table manners through the ages. Dinner time used to be a whole different experience, and it wasn’t just WHAT they ate, it was HOW they ate it. It was also how they ACTED while eating. The rules about eating with fingers and burping have changed a lot! In the There's a Rat in My Souppast you could wipe your dirty fingers on the tablecloth and nobody thought anything of it and burping was a compliment to the chef! Your mom might not want you to use a time machine to bring some of these customs back, but some of the food people used to eat looks pretty good. Of course some of it doesn’t sound very good at all! How brave are you? There could be a rat in your soup! Try one of these books to take a foodie adventure back in time.


Food History Books:

It's Disgusting and We Ate ItThe World in Your LunchboxGeorge Crum and the Saratoga ChipEat Your US History HomeworkChocolate a Sweet HistoryHasty PuddingDouble CheeseburgersPasta Fried Rice and Matzah Balls Immigrant CookingHot Diggity DogA Fine DessertFood for ThoughtPass the Pandowdy Please

The History of Famous Food Brands:

Ben and JerryCaleb Davis BradhamClarence BirdseyeCoca ColaColonel Harlan SandersDairy QueenDave ThomasEtorrie BojardiFannie in the KitchenHersheysJohn PembertonKraftMilton HersheyRay CrocRobert CadeThe Chocolate Chip Cookie QueenThe Kellogg FamilyThe Mars FamilyTom MonaghanWilliam WrigleyMilton Hershey More Than Chocolate
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Juneteenth

Juneteenth

It is easy to boil down something that happened a long time ago into a simple story that really wasn’t simple at all. Sometimes that happens because time passes and memories fade. Sometimes that happens because the story is complicated to begin with. The ending of slavery in America is complicated in that way. It did not happen all at once like you might think.

Today, June 19th, is Juneteenth, a day that commemorates the end of slavery. Why this day? On June 19, 1865 Union soldiers arrived in Texas and spread the word that President Lincoln had delivered his Emancipation Procalamation on January 1, 1863…two YEARS earlier. Back in those days, it took news A LOT longer to travel! Plus, in this case, there were people who deliberately kept the news from traveling. Here is the timeline:

1. January 1, 1863 The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order made by Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. It declared slaves in the Confederacy free. It affected some slaves, but not all of them.

2. June 19, 1865 Freedom Day in Texas – Texas was very remote back then and news traveled slow. It also took a Free at Lastlong time for the Union army to makes its way to Texas. On June 19, a Union General read out loud “General Order No. 3”, announcing the total emancipation of slaves in Texas. The day became known as “Juneteenth” (“June” plus “nineteenth”) and is widely celebrated today in Texas and across the country, as an important day commemorating the freeing of slaves in America.

3. December 6, 1865 The Thirteenth Amendment This amendment to the Constitution completely abolished slavery and involuntary servitude except as the punishment of a crime.

Books:

Abraham Lincoln the Great EmancipatorBen and the Emancipation ProclamationDays of JubileeEmancipation Proclamation Lincoln and the Dawn of LibertyEmancipation ProclamationFifty Cents and a Dream Young Booker T. WashingtonFreedom from SlaveryFreedom's Gifts a Juneteenth StoryHope's GiftHow Abraham Lincoln Ended SlaveryJuneteenthJuneteenthJuneteenthJuneteenthJuneteenth JamboreeLift Every Voice and SingThe Story of JuneteenthWhen Were the Slaves First Set Free After the Civil War
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Women’s History: Writers

Women’s History: Writers

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

Brown Girl DreamingMiss Mary ReportingGirl from YamhillMy Own Two FeetZoraLooking BackLittle Author in the Big WoodsMaya AngelouBronte SistersLouisa May AlcottVoice of her OwnBylinesIda B WellsLibertys VoiceJudy BlumeWrite On MercyPhillis Sings Out FreedomWanda Gag

More about Women’s History:

 

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Women’s History: Artists

Women’s History: Artists

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project


Beatrix Potter and her PaintboxCloth LullabyDorothea's EyesMary CassattPatience WrightSewing StoriesViva FridaThrough Georgia's EyesMy Name is GeorgiaRestless SpiritStand There She ShoutedImogen

More about Women’s History:


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Women’s History: Athletes

Women’s History: Athletes

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project


Books:

Yes She Can SportsDirt on their SkirtsBasketball BellesQueen of the TrackDanica PatrickThe Golden Girls of RioSerena WilliamsWhen Wilma Rudolph Played BasketballThe Kid from Diamond StreetMermaid QueenFearlessTouch the SkyNothing But TroubleAmerica's Champion SwimmerWilma UnlimitedTillie the Terrible Swede

More about Women’s History:

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