Category Archives: Homework Help

Homework Help: Science Experiments

Homework Help: Science Experiments

2013novScienceFairIdeas

Looking for an idea for a science project? Here are several science experiment ideas that use materials easily found in your house. A couple of them might require a trip to the grocery store or pharmacy, but mostly you can just raid the garage, kitchen or medicine chest for the ingredients. Many experiments you will want to do OUTSIDE. Each experiment will give you directions as well as suggest websites and books that will help you explain what science is at work during the experiment.

Science Project Ideas:

ATOMS & MOLECULES
Atoms: A Bunch of Empty Space
Density: Buoyancy
Density: Layer Column
Density: Marbling Paper
Density: Straw Mix
Miscible Molecules: Lava Bottle
Polymers: Poke Holes in a Ziploc
Polymers: Borax Goo
Polymers: Cornstarch Goo
Saturation: Growing Crystals
Soluability: Sharpie Pen Tie Dye
Supersaturated: Borax Crystals & Rock Candy
Static Electricity: Salt and Pepper Separator
Surface Tension: Pepper Scatter
Surface Tension: Soap Bubbles
Surface Tension: Sand Castles

CHEMICAL REACTIONS
Acids: Bouncing Egg
Acids: Folding Egg
Chemical Bond: Kool Aid Tie Dye
Chemical Reaction: Exploding Ziploc
Chemical Reaction: Penny Cleaner
Chemical Reaction: Plastic Bottle Geyser
Chemical Reaction: Milk Play Dough
Chemical Reaction: Milk Glue
Nucleation: Mentos Volcano
Oxidation: Brown Apples

HEAT
Heat: Fireproof Balloon
Insulators: Blubber Test
Insulators: Keeping Warm
Melting Point: DIY Slushie
Heated Gases Expand: Ivory Soap

PHYSICS
Aerodynamics: Paper Airplanes
Air Pressure: Straw Through an Apple
Air Pressure: Do Not Open Bottle
Centripetal Force: Hex in a Balloon
Centripetal Force: Tornado in a Bottle
Friction: Thick Book Friction
Momentum: Pendulums
Newton’s 1st Law (Inertia): Tablecloth Trick & Egg Drop
Newton’s Second Law: Comet Cratering
Newton’s Third Law: Rocket
Center of Gravity: Fork on a Glass & Balanced Pop Can
Chromatography: Black Ink
Gravity: Stacking
Engineering: Newspaper Geodesic Dome
Engineering: Build a Bridge
Potential & Kinetic Energy: Marshmallow Catapult

BIOLOGY (LIFE)
Cell Respiration: Balloon Blow Up
Hydrologic (Water) Cycle: Make a Terrarium
Transpiration: Flower Transformation

 

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Websites:

Here are some websites that have great step-by-step directions and photographs for planning a great science project.

Databases:

GaleScience Science in Context: This is a database you can look at with your IndyPL Library Card Number and PIN to get Science Experiment ideas and to do background research once you choose a subject. (What’s my PIN?)
science-fair-discoverer-logo Science Fair Discoverer: This is a great way to find experiments that use common around-the-house items.  Search by asking where you want to begin:  In the recycling bin?  In the junk drawer?  In the yard? In the Kitchen? In the Bathroom?   When an experiment is selected, you will see a list of needed items and directions. (What’s my PIN?)

Books:

oh-ickoutdoor-science-labscience-experiments-you-can-eat

Star Wars Science Fair Book 101 Great Science Experiments We Dare You Candy Experiments
Edible Science Hands On Science Experiments Kitchen Science Experiments Ruff Ruffmans 44 Favorite Science Activities
Science Rocks Try This Fizz and Bubble Surprise and Delight
101-coolest-simple-science-experiments diy-science labcraft-wizards maker-lab
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Homework Help: the 13 Colonies

Homework Help: the 13 Colonies

More Homework Help

 

Colonial Voices is a book of poems written in the voice of a different colonist. Each poem is from a different person’s point of view. If you were interviewing people in colonial times, how might the point of view of an English soldier differ from a cabin boy on a ship or a slave or a blacksmith? By reading about an event from the perspective of different people, you can get a more well-rounded idea of what that event or time period was really like. You can do the same thing by reading books that tell you about the different people, customs and events of a certain time period.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the 13 colonies and the colonial period. To give you a start looking at what life was like back then, here are some colonial items that are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“The purse was made in the late 1700s. 18th century women didn’t carry purses like women of today do—they didn’t carry much in the way of toiletries or money, so they didn’t need to. The woman who owned this would have kept a variety of small objects in this pocketbook, which she could have carried in her pocket (a separate bag worn under her skirt.)”

“This kind of infant’s shirt was known as a waistcoat and was probably worn over another shirt for extra warmth. This one is made of block-printed cotton and lined with linen. It was worn by John H. Hardenbergh when he was born in 1798.”

This tankard and plate are made of pewter. “Pewter was a popular material for dishes until the mid 1800s when glass and pottery became more preferred. Pewter dishes were common in Colonial America, but England kept tight control of the import of the raw tin needed for making pewter, so most pieces were made in England or recast from melted down older pieces.”

More Colonial Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Printables, Crafts & Websites:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: American Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the 13 colonies.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about the 13 Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the 13 colonies. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

I Walk in DreadPilgrim Voices Our First Year in the New WorldRebekah in DangerA Light in the ForestT

Print Books History:

12 Incredible Facts about the Boston Tea Party Book JacketBlack Stars of Colonial and Revolutionary TimesBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin Breetches Book JacketColonial Comics Book JacketColonial People the Doctor Book JacketColonial Williamsburg Book JacketExplore Colonial America Book JacketJohn Smith Escapes Again Book JacketMolly Pitcher Book JacketPhillis Wheatley Book JacketPocahontas Princess of the New World Book JacketThe Extraordinary Suzy Wright Book JacketThe Mayflower Compact Book JacketThe Mayflower Book JacketThe Scoop on Homes Clothes and Daily Life in Colonial AmericaYou Wouldn't Want to Be an American Colonist Book JacketYour Life as a Settler in Colonial AmericaWomen of Colonial America Book JacketColonial Food Book Jacket

Print Books Stories:

Blue Birds Book JacketThe Courage of Sarah Noble Book JacketThe Witch of Blackbird Pond Book Jacket
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Homework Help: Native Americans

Homework Help: Native Americans

First PeopleBefore the European conquest, North America was home to more than 300 Native American tribes. Each of them has its own history, art, culture and traditions. This illustrated history book will show you many of them. It includes maps, charts and timelines too to help you with homework questions about particular groups. Listed below are more websites and books to help you do research.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about Native Americans. To give you a start looking at what their life was like, you can look at some images like this one of Native American items that are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Cradleboard – “Native American mothers, aunts, and grandmothers demonstrated their love and hope for infants by creating elaborately decorated cradle covers or cradleboards. They used beads, pain, wood, or tacks to make special carriers for their infants. Mothers carried their babies in the cradleboards, like this one, or strapped it to the side of a horse. It was easy to prop the cradleboard with the infant near a tree or dwelling while the mother performed daily chores. Many elders believed cradleboards “socialized” infants when worn because it brought the child to the eye level of the adults.” More Native American Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Native Americans.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read about Native Americans. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Indiana Books & WebsitesFocus on Indiana:

The Miami, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Mascoutens, Delaware (Lenape), Shawnee were some of the Native Americans that lived in Indiana before settlers came here. One of the most well-known Native Americans from Indiana is the Miami Chief, Little Turtle. The websites and books below will help you learn more about Native Americans who lived in Indiana.

The MiamisSalt

eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

Bones on the GroundThe Rough Face GirlThe Porcupine YearThe Legend of the Indian PaintbrushThe Legend of the BluebonnetSequoyahMore Than MoccasinsMakoonsIf You Lived With the Iroquois

Print Books:

Before ColumbusBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin BreechesChildren of the TipiExplore Native American CulturesExploring the Life, Myth and Art of Native AmericansHiawatha and the PeacemakerLooks Like Daylight Voices of Indigenous KidsNative American Heroes Native American MythologyNative Americans a Visual ExplorationHands on History Native AmericansRed CloudTecumsehUndefeated Jim ThorpeU-X-L Encyclopedia of Native American TribesBuffalo Bird GirlCrossing Bok ChittoGhost HawkPaiute PrincessThe Birchbark HouseThe Legend of Lightning and ThunderThe Man Who Dreamed of Elk DogsThe Story of Jumping MouseThe Woman Who Lived with the Wolves
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Author Spotlight: Kekla Magoon

Author Spotlight: Kekla Magoon

 

“Kekla Magoon grew up in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She wrote her first novel when she was in high school. She should have known then that she was destined to be an author, but it actually took her awhile longer to figure out what she wanted to do with her life. Kekla always loved books, though. Her mom read lots of books to her, and took her to the library every week so she could read and read and read. Kekla made a habit of checking out as many paperbacks as she could carry!” ~keklamagoon.com biography

Kelkla was the National Indiana Author Award for 2017!

 


Awards:

Coretta Scott King Honor Books:

Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe Award New Talent:

NAACP Image Award:


eBooks & eAudio:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks & eAudiobooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive Logo

Shadows of SherwoodHow It Went DownInfinity RidersX: A Novel

Print Books:

Camo GirlFire in the StreetsRebellion of ThievesThe Rock and the River

More about Black History:


To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Author Spotlight: James Whitcomb Riley

Author Spotlight: James Whitcomb Riley

The poet James Whitcomb Riley was born in Greenfield, Indiana on October 7, 1849. To give you an idea how long ago that was, he was about 12 years old when the U.S. Civil War started.  Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell were both born around the same time.

At the time of his death on July 22, 1916, James Whitcomb Riley was a beloved figure in Indiana. He was also well known for writing in dialect. A dialect is a particular form of a language that is special to a specific region, in this case Indiana. It is similar to what we would call an accent today. When a person read his poetry, it was like listening to a neighbor and people really liked that. Many of his poems were funny. People really liked that too. Riley traveled the country giving live shows reading his poetry. In his time, he was a rock star! His death was such news it made front page headlines in major newspapers all across the country. There is an old scrapbook of the events that followed his death at The James Whitcomb Riley Home & Museum. You can look at this scrapbook online. It has all kinds of old newspaper clippings in it. One of the headlines about his funeral says, “35,000 People Pass Casket of Indiana Poet”. That is a lot of people! 

During Riley’s life people did not have radios in their homes yet. To listen to music or readings they used phonographs. In Riley’s day you had to hand crank a machine to listen to a recording. Very early ones recorded onto cylinders. Later ones recorded onto flat discs, like a CD, only larger. Today you can play a digital file of an audiobook on your phone or computer. In 1912 Riley recorded poetry readings for the Victor Talking Machine Company on one of those flat discs so that people could listen at home – an old time audiobook. We have these old Riley Recordings at IndyPL in our digital collection. James Whitcomb Riley Recordings You can listen to the man himself reading his own poetry. Lucky for you they are in a digital file now!

Mr. Riley’s most famous poems for children were and still are, “Raggedy Man,” “The Little Orphant Annie,” “When the Frost is on the Punkin,” and “The Old Swimmin’ Hole.” You can read them right now in these free eBooks from IUPUI. I recommend the deliciously scary “The Little Orphant Annie.” Annie is a great storyteller! She tells the story of why you better mind your parents because “The gobble-uns’ll git you ef you don’t watch out!” To read it click on the green book Riley Child Rhymes and then click on page 23.

Read Right Now! Free eBooks:

Riley Child RhymesThe Book of Joyous ChildrenThe Raggedy Man

Websites:

In the spirit of another beloved Hoosier, David Letterman:

Top 10 Ways to Know James Whitcomb Riley was a Rock Star of his Time:

10. His book  Rhymes of Childhood was published in 1912. Today, over 100 years later, you can easily find his book at the library or go to an online bookstore and find it for sale as a print book or an eBook. There are not very many books that are still printed from that long ago!

9. In the late 1890s he encouraged the African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. He wrote Dunbar a letter of recommendation that helped get his work published.

8. When Riley died, the President of the United states, Woodrow Wilson, and the Vice-President of the United States, Thomas Riley Marshall (who was from Columbia City, Indiana), both sent messages of condolence to his family. The Governor of Indiana allowed him to be laid in state at The Indiana Statehouse Rotunda so that people could come pay their respects. Until that time, only Abraham Lincoln had been honored in that way.

7. Greenfield, IN, his birthplace, and Indianapolis, IN, his home for over 20 years, fought over where he should be buried. Over Riley’s Dead Body: Indy’s Weirdest Civic Fight. Indianapolis won. He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in a tomb at the top of a hill, the highest point in Indianapolis. Section 61, Lot 1.

6. Both his boyhood home in Greenfield, IN and his adult home in Indianapolis, IN are museums and on the National Register of Historic Places.

5. The James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children was created and named in his honor in 1924. In 1955 the hospital added Camp Riley, a camp for youth with disabilities.

4. In 1940, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 10-cent stamp honoring Riley.

3. A cargo ship, the SS James Whitcomb Riley, was commissioned in 1942 during World War II.

2. There used to be a Hoosier Poet Brand of coffee, oatmeal, vegetables, cigars and more.

1. James Whitcomb Riley donated the land indyPL’s Central Library is built on. The bronze gates at the main entrance on St. Clair Street were purchased with pennies donated by children. The bronze tablets on each of the iron gates say: The gates are the gift of the children of Indianapolis in loving remembrance of their friend James Whitcomb Riley

Print Books:

When the Frost is on the PunkinThe Gobble-uns'll Git You Ef You Don't Watch OutLittle Orphant AnnieHoosier Boy James Whitcomb RileyJames Whitcomb Riley Young Poet
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