Category Archives: Homework Help

Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Cool Astronomy shows you 50 ways to enjoy the sky. A solar eclipse is when the moon  passes between the earth and the sun. When this happens the moon blocks the sun. If it is a total eclipse, the sun is completely covered up. If it is partial eclipse, only part of the sun is covered up.

One of the things you can learn in this book is how to watch a solar eclipse safely. This is really important to know because watching a solar eclipse incorrectly can hurt your eyes. Your retina can actually get burned by the sun. You can get “eclipse blindness”. “Eclipse blindness” can go away, or if it is bad enough, can be permanent. What makes “eclipse blindness” especially dangerous is that there are no nerves in the retina of your eye and you will not feel yourself being hurt. You will only notice later when you can’t see right, but the damage to your eye will already done. So please read Exploratoriuam: How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely. Observe, but do it the right way!

Here is a library program that will help you have fun learning about solar eclipses.

The Art of the Eclipse

Art of the Eclipse Class Various Branches in August & September School-age children are invited to join Art With a Heart for a program full of art and science inspired by the stars, sun, and moon. Schedule

You might also like learning about the Perseid Meteor Shower.


Video on the Sun & Viewing Solar Eclipses Safely:


Websites:

Science in Context: Eclipses is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Eclipses.​


Books about Solar Eclipses:

Solar and Lunar EclipsesEclipsesLooking Up Looking Up!

Space Stories:

Book jacket for Missile Mouse Rescue on Tankium 3The True Meaning of SmekdayThe Dead GentlemanAmulet The StonekeeperBook jacket for Zita the Space GirlBook jacket for Every Soul a StarBook jacket for Boom!CosmicThe Search for Wondla
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Homework Help: Meteor Showers

Homework Help: Meteor Showers

National Geographic Kids Meteors

Have you ever seen a “shooting” or “falling” star? These streaks of light are not actually stars at all, but space rocks falling through the earth’s atmosphere. These rocks are called meteoroids or meteors. As the meteor falls it rubs against particle’s in the earth’s atmosphere which creates friction, making the meteor extremely hot. Usually, the meteors become so hot they burn up and disappear before hitting the earth. The flame of that burning up is what we see and what makes meteors look like a star falling out of the sky. If a meteor does survive its journey through the atmosphere and lands on the earth, it is called a meteorite.

At certain times of year we can see a lot of meteors all at once because the earth is passing through a field of space rocks. These times of year are called “meteor showers” because so many space rocks are falling through the earth’s atmosphere at one time. Each year in late summer the Earth passes through a trail of dust and debris left by an ancient comet called Comet Swift-Tuttle. This creates a high number of meteors and is called the Perseid Meteor Shower because the meteors appear to come from within the constellation Perseus.

In 2018 the Perseid Meteor Shower will occur from July 17 to Aug. 24. It will peak on August 12th and 13th. The best way to see meteors is to go outside after dark, lie on your back and look straight up. You might have to wait. Bring a good snack – like popcorn! You  might also like to know about solar eclipses.

TCM Meteor

 

This meteorite is an Artifact at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“Meteorites are one of the few extraterrestrial, from outer space, materials scientists have to study. Most meteorites found on the ground are iron, which are very dense and appear quite different from ordinary rock. This is a Gibeon meteorite made up mostly of iron and nickel. These meteorites resulted in a huge meteor shower that occurred thousands of years ago. Upon hitting he earth’s atmosphere, a large iron mass (or masses) fragmented, showering down to Earth. These fragments were first reported in 1838, with more fragments showing up in following years as Europeans moved in.”

 

 

Websites:

Science in Context: Comets, Meteors & Asteroids is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Comets, Meteors & Asteroids.​


Books:

Comets Meteors and AsteroidsHow the Meteorite Got to the MuseumMeteor ShowersMeteorsNational Geographic Kids MeteorsSeven Wonders of Asteroids Meteors and CometsShooting StarsMeteor!My Friend the StarfinderOlivia Wishes on a StarOne Starry Night
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Author Spotlight: Judy Blume

Author Spotlight: Judy Blume


Books by Judy Blume:

Are You There God It's Me MargaretFreckle JuiceIggie's HouseSuperfudgeTales of a Fourth Grade Nothing

Websites:


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

More about Women’s History:

 

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Author Spotlight: Virginia Hamilton

Author Spotlight: Virginia Hamilton


Books by Virginia Hamilton:

M.C. Higgins the GreatThe House of Dies DrearThe People Could Fly

Websites:


More about Women’s History:

 

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Author Spotlight: Pam Muñoz Ryan

Author Spotlight: Pam Muñoz Ryan


Books by Pam Muñoz Ryan:

Becoming Naomi LeonEchoEsperanza RisingPaint the WindThe Dreamer

Websites:


More about Women’s History:

 

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