Category Archives: Homework Help

Women’s History: Activists & Groundbreakers

Women’s History: Activists & Groundbreakers

More Homework Help: Women’s History

She Persisted

She Persisted is a biography of Elizabeth Warren, the first female senator from Massachusetts. As a lawyer and politician Elizabeth works to help people to improve their lives. This page includes biographies of several female activists who have done the same. They have contributed their skills and experience to politics, medicine, education, health care and  more.

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project


Books

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Sharking Things UpShe PersistedMiss Moore Thought OtherwiseA Lady Has the FloorHillary Rodham Clinton Some Girls Are Born to LeadI DissentMalala Activist for Girls' EducationGloria's VoiceShe Stood for FreedomTurning PagesWalking Through the City with JaneClara and DavieBrave GirlClaudette ColvinCoretta ScottEleanor Quiet No MoreElizabeth Leads the WayForbidden SchoolhouseGirl From the Tar Paper SchoolI Could Do ThatIda M TarbellSusan B AnthonyLibrarian of BasraMary Walker Wears PantsMy Name is GabrielaPaiute PrincessSeparate Is Never EqualSide By Side
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Women’s History: Artists

Women’s History: Artists

More Homework Help: Women’s History

Fancy Party Gowns

Fancy Party Gowns is a biography of fashion designer Ann Lowe. Ann was the first African American to become a well known designer and was a favorite of women in the 1920s through the 1960s. She is most remembered for designing a wedding dress for Jacqueline Kennedy who became first lady when her husband, John F. Kennedy, was elected President of the United States. Like Ann, the other women featured on this page are noted artists and creators.

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project


Books

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Different Like CocoBloomDorothea langeDorothea's EyesPocket Full of ColorsThe Girl Who Drew ButterfliesCloth LullabyMary CassattPatience WrightSewing StoriesViva FridaThrough Georgia's EyesMy Name is GeorgiaRestless SpiritStand There She ShoutedImogen
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Homework Help: Science Experiments

Homework Help: Science Experiments

2013novScienceFairIdeas

Looking for an idea for a science project? Here are several science experiment ideas that use materials easily found in your house. A couple of them might require a trip to the grocery store or pharmacy, but mostly you can just raid the garage, kitchen or medicine chest for the ingredients. Many experiments you will want to do OUTSIDE. Each experiment will give you directions as well as suggest websites and books that will help you explain what science is at work during the experiment.

Science Project Ideas:

ATOMS & MOLECULES
Atoms: A Bunch of Empty Space
Density: Buoyancy
Density: Layer Column
Density: Marbling Paper
Density: Straw Mix
Miscible Molecules: Lava Bottle
Polymers: Poke Holes in a Ziploc
Polymers: Borax Goo
Polymers: Cornstarch Goo
Saturation: Growing Crystals
Soluability: Sharpie Pen Tie Dye
Supersaturated: Borax Crystals & Rock Candy
Static Electricity: Salt and Pepper Separator
Surface Tension: Pepper Scatter
Surface Tension: Soap Bubbles
Surface Tension: Sand Castles

CHEMICAL REACTIONS
Acids: Bouncing Egg
Acids: Folding Egg
Chemical Bond: Kool Aid Tie Dye
Chemical Reaction: Exploding Ziploc
Chemical Reaction: Penny Cleaner
Chemical Reaction: Plastic Bottle Geyser
Chemical Reaction: Milk Play Dough
Chemical Reaction: Milk Glue
Nucleation: Mentos Volcano
Oxidation: Brown Apples

HEAT
Heat: Fireproof Balloon
Insulators: Blubber Test
Insulators: Keeping Warm
Melting Point: DIY Slushie
Heated Gases Expand: Ivory Soap

PHYSICS
Aerodynamics: Paper Airplanes
Air Pressure: Straw Through an Apple
Air Pressure: Do Not Open Bottle
Centripetal Force: Hex in a Balloon
Centripetal Force: Tornado in a Bottle
Friction: Thick Book Friction
Momentum: Pendulums
Newton’s 1st Law (Inertia): Tablecloth Trick & Egg Drop
Newton’s Second Law: Comet Cratering
Newton’s Third Law: Rocket
Center of Gravity: Fork on a Glass & Balanced Pop Can
Chromatography: Black Ink
Gravity: Stacking
Engineering: Newspaper Geodesic Dome
Engineering: Build a Bridge
Potential & Kinetic Energy: Marshmallow Catapult

BIOLOGY (LIFE)
Cell Respiration: Balloon Blow Up
Hydrologic (Water) Cycle: Make a Terrarium
Transpiration: Flower Transformation

 

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Websites:

Here are some websites that have great step-by-step directions and photographs for planning a great science project.

Databases:

GaleScience Science in Context: This is a database you can look at with your IndyPL Library Card Number and PIN to get Science Experiment ideas and to do background research once you choose a subject. (What’s my PIN?)
science-fair-discoverer-logo Science Fair Discoverer: This is a great way to find experiments that use common around-the-house items.  Search by asking where you want to begin:  In the recycling bin?  In the junk drawer?  In the yard? In the Kitchen? In the Bathroom?   When an experiment is selected, you will see a list of needed items and directions. (What’s my PIN?)

Books:

oh-ickoutdoor-science-labscience-experiments-you-can-eat

Star Wars Science Fair Book 101 Great Science Experiments We Dare You Candy Experiments
Edible Science Hands On Science Experiments Kitchen Science Experiments Ruff Ruffmans 44 Favorite Science Activities
Science Rocks Try This Fizz and Bubble Surprise and Delight
101-coolest-simple-science-experiments diy-science labcraft-wizards maker-lab
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13 Colonies

13 Colonies

More Homework Help – History & Social Studies

Colonial Voices is a book of poems written in the voice of a different colonist. Each poem is from a different person’s point of view. If you were interviewing people in colonial times, how might the point of view of an English soldier differ from a cabin boy on a ship or a slave or a blacksmith? By reading about an event from the perspective of different people, you can get a more well-rounded idea of what that event or time period was really like. You can do the same thing by reading books that tell you about the different people, customs and events of a certain time period.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the 13 colonies and the colonial period. To give you a start looking at what life was like back then, here are some colonial items that are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“The purse was made in the late 1700s. 18th century women didn’t carry purses like women of today do—they didn’t carry much in the way of toiletries or money, so they didn’t need to. The woman who owned this would have kept a variety of small objects in this pocketbook, which she could have carried in her pocket (a separate bag worn under her skirt.)”

“This kind of infant’s shirt was known as a waistcoat and was probably worn over another shirt for extra warmth. This one is made of block-printed cotton and lined with linen. It was worn by John H. Hardenbergh when he was born in 1798.”

This tankard and plate are made of pewter. “Pewter was a popular material for dishes until the mid 1800s when glass and pottery became more preferred. Pewter dishes were common in Colonial America, but England kept tight control of the import of the raw tin needed for making pewter, so most pieces were made in England or recast from melted down older pieces.”

More Colonial Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Printables, Activities & Websites:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: American Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your library card number. It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the 13 colonies.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about the 13 Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your library card number. Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the 13 colonies. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations. Click on a book jacket below to request the book. You will be notified when it is available for you to pick up. If the book is an e-book or e-audiobook you can check it out right now using your library card. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Black Stars of Colonial and Revolutionary TimesThe Mayflower and the Pilgrims of the New WorldBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin Breetches Book JacketColonial Comics Book JacketColonial Williamsburg Book JacketExplore Colonial America Book JacketThe Mayflower Compact Book JacketThe Mayflower Book JacketThe Scoop on Homes Clothes and Daily Life in Colonial AmericaYou Wouldn't Want to Be an American Colonist Book JacketYour Life as a Settler in Colonial AmericaWomen of Colonial America Book JacketColonial Food Book JacketPilgrim Voices Our First Year in the New WorldJohn Smith Escapes Again Book JacketMolly Pitcher Book JacketPhillis Wheatley Book JacketPocahontas Princess of the New World Book JacketThe Extraordinary Suzy Wright Book JacketA Light in the ForestBlue Birds Book JacketThe Courage of Sarah Noble Book JacketThe Witch of Blackbird Pond Book Jacket
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Native Americans

Native Americans

More Homework Help – History & Social Studies

Edward S. Curtis Chronicles Native NtionsEdward S. Curtis was an American photographer born in 1868. His specialty was taking pictures of the American West and Native Americans. He had a vision to document as much of Native American tradition and culture as he could before their way of life disappeared.

In Native Nations you will learn about Curtis’s life, but also learn about how he became interested in documenting the lives of the people he saw and why he felt it was so important to capture these images. Thank goodness he did! The book includes many of his photographs. These are not re-enactments. These are not models or actors dressed in traditional clothes. These are photographs taken of real people in the actual time period. The images are capture what a person would have seen at the time with his or her own eyes. Curtis was a photo-journalist long before anyone thought to use that term. Listed below are more websites and books to help you learn and do research about Native Americans.

To give you a start looking at what their life was like, you can look at some historical artifacts like this cradleboard which is part of the collection of Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Cradleboard – “Native American mothers, aunts, and grandmothers demonstrated their love and hope for infants by creating elaborately decorated cradle covers or cradleboards. They used beads, pain, wood, or tacks to make special carriers for their infants. Mothers carried their babies in the cradleboards, like this one, or strapped it to the side of a horse. It was easy to prop the cradleboard with the infant near a tree or dwelling while the mother performed daily chores. Many elders believed cradleboards “socialized” infants when worn because it brought the child to the eye level of the adults.” More Native American Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Native Americans.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read about Native Americans. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

U-X-L Encyclopedia of Native American TribesNative Americans a Visual ExplorationHands on History Native AmericansBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin BreechesLooks Like Daylight Voices of Indigenous KidsBones on the GroundChildren of the TipiBefore ColumbusExploring the Life, Myth and Art of Native AmericansDo All Indians Live in TipisTurtle IslandNative American HeroesSequoyahHiawatha and the PeacemakerRed CloudTecumsehUndefeated Jim ThorpePaiute PrincessChester Nez and the Unbreakable CodeSitting BullThe Rough Face GirlThe Legend of the Indian PaintbrushThe Legend of the BluebonnetBuffalo Bird GirlCrossing Bok ChittoHow Raven Got His Crooked NoseTricksterThe Birchbark HouseMakoonsGhost HawkIn the Footsteps of Crazy HorseFatty LegsHow I Became a GhostThe Spirit Trackers

Indiana Books & WebsitesFocus on Indiana:

The Miami, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Mascoutens, Delaware (Lenape), Shawnee were some of the Native Americans that lived in Indiana before settlers came here. One of the most well-known Native Americans from Indiana is the Miami Chief, Little Turtle. The websites and books below will help you learn more about Native Americans who lived in Indiana.

The MiamisSalt
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