Tag Archives: Booklist

Star Wars Reads!

Star Wars Reads!

star-wars-readsCelebrate Star Wars Reads – an annual October event that gets the whole country reading about the Star Wars Universe, all at the same time. But you don’t have to wait for a special day, you can have reading adventures with your favorite Star Wars characters EVERY day. There are chapter books, graphic novels, craft books, pintables, activities and more to celebrate your favorite Star Wars characters.

Star Wars Read Day @ Pike Sat, Oct 21, 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Families are invited to master the art of reading and enjoy a day filled with Star Wars fun. Dress in your intergalactic best, create something out of this world at the craft table, and test your knowledge of all things Star Wars. Everyone will blast off with something exciting to take home!

Star Wars Read Day at Nora Sat., Oct 28, 2:oo-4:00pm
Individuals of all ages are invited to drop in anytime to participate in a Star Wars themed craft and activities. Get in the spirit by dressing up as your favorite Star Wars character!

Websites & Activities:

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eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?

Darth Vader and FriendsEdge of the GalaxyFinn and the First OrderJedi AcademyReturn of the Dark SideStar Wars AliensThe Adventures of C-3POThe Life and Legend of Obi Wan-KenobiThe Phantom Menace Storybook

eAudios:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?

Return of the Jedi Beware the Power of the Dark SideRey's StoryThe Empire Strikes BackThe Force Awakens

Museum Artifacts:

Han Solo in CarboniteHan Solo in Carbonite – This replica of the original Han Solo prop was made from the actual molds created for the Star Wars films. In The Empire Strikes Back, the character Han Solowas captured by bounty hunter Boba Fett. Solo was flash-frozen in carbonite-alive, yet entombed. He hung as a trophy on Jabba the Hutt’s wall until being rescuedby his Rebel friends in the film, Return of the Jedi.

Millenium FalconStar Wars Millenium Falcon & Two Figures – Never tell me the odds! could well be Han Solo’s motto. Not the fresh faced hero of George Lucas’ film, Lucas considered Han Solo “a loner who realizes the importance of being part of a group and helping for the common good.” From smuggler to TCM Logo 150general for the rebel alliance, Solo along with fellow adventurer Chewbacca formed a team in the classic tale of good versus evil which blended the best of old-fashioned cliffhangers and science fiction with groundbreaking special effects. This 1981 toy Millennium Falcon was made by Kenner. Toys released after Star Wars in 1977 launched the trend of “mega-marketing” major movies with products. A new generation of fans discovered the Star Wars series with the release of episodes I, II, and III between 1999 and 2005.


Fiction:

Skywalker Strikes Volume OneStar Wars Darth Vader Volume OneStar Wars Rebel HeroesVader Down Volume OneThe Princess and the ScoundrelJedi AcademyThe Strange Case of Origami YodaRebel ForceDark Horse ComicsBB-8 on the Run

Non-Fiction:

Star Wars Character EncyclopediaStar Wars Galactic MapsStar Wars the Force Awakens Incredible Cross-SectionsThe Force Awakens Visual DictionaryThe Amazing Book of Lego Star WarsThe Amazing Book of Star WarsStar Wars The Complete Visual DictionaryLego Star Wars the Visual DictionaryWho Are the JediStar Wars Rebels the Visual GuideThe Secret Life of DroidsBeware the SithStar Wars Incredible VehiclesStar Wars Complete VehiclesLego Star Wars in 100 ScenesLego Star Wars The Dark SideStar Wars Absolutely Everything You Need to KnowStar Wars Science Fair BookStar Wars Cook Book
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15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum was originally published in 1900. When Central Library opened in 1917 this is what the book looked like then. After more than 100 years it is still a favorite! It’s a classic. That means it has stayed popular for a long time. 100 years is definitely a long time! Listed below are 15 classic children’s books that were on the library shelves in 1917 and are still favorites on the library shelves in 2017.

The book covers on the left show you what the books looked like in 1917. Click on one of the old book jackets to read the book online. You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free!

The book covers on the right show you what the books look like today. Click on one of these newer versions to see it in the computer catalog. You can place a hold there with your library card if you would like to read it. For most of the newer versions just the cover and maybe the illustrations have changed, but for some of them the story has been changed a little to either reflect the times or tell the story in a new way. Try Matt Phelan’s Snow White. It’s a graphic novel version that is really good!

You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at indyPL Kids’: Staying Power – 50 Classic Kids’ Books,  Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Tells the adventures and pranks of a mischievous boy growing up in a Mississippi River town in the early nineteenth century.


Aesop's FablesAesop's FablesAesop’s Fables – Aesop’s wise, witty and timeless fables. The version on the right sets the fables in an African setting.


Alice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Offers the classic tale about a young girl who goes on a fantastical trip after falling into a deep hole where she meets a cast of weird and wonderful creatures along the way.


Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables – Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

 


 

CinderellaCinderellaCinderella – In her haste to flee the palace before the fairy godmother’s magic loses effect, Cinderella leaves behind a glass slipper.


HeidiHeidiHeidi – A Swiss orphan is heartbroken when she must leave her beloved grandfather and their happy home in the mountains to go to school and to care for an invalid girl in the city.

 


 

The Jungle BookThe Jungle BookThe Jungle Book – An anthology of stories chronicles the adventures of Mowgli, a young boy raised by wolves, as he learns the ways of the jungle from Baloo the bear and matches wits with his archenemy, Shere Khan, in a collection that also includes the tale of Rikki-tikki-tavi.


The Little PrincessA Little PrincessA Little Princess – Alone in a new country, wealthy Sara Crewe tries to make friends at boarding school and settle in. But when she learns that she’ll never see her beloved father again, her life is turned upside down. Transformed from princess to pauper, she must swap dancing lessons and luxury for drudgery and a room in the attic. Will she find that kindness and generosity are all the riches she truly needs?


PinocchioPinocchioPinocchio – The adventures of a talking wooden puppet whose nose grows whenever he tells a lie.


The Secret GardenThe Secret GardenThe Secret Garden – A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

 


 

Snow WhiteSnow WhiteSnow White – The story of a beleaguered girl who finds shelter with seven dwarves after the sudden death of her father and suffering cruelty at the hands of her stepmother.


The Story of the Three PigsThe Story of the Three PigsThree Little Pigs – The three pigs and their narrow escape of the wolf.


Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking GlassThrough the Looking Glass – In this sequel to “Alice in Wonderland” Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.


The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows – The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside–Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger.

 


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Favorite Teachers in Chapter Books

Favorite Teachers in Chapter Books

We love teachers! Can you name your very favorite teachers? I can. Miss Sellers, Mr. Yoder, Mrs. Hayworth, Mrs. Reed. I could name more. I was lucky because I had a lot of good ones. Do you have anybody that is Professor McGonagall good? What are the things you like so much about a favorite teacher? My favorite thing in a teacher was someone who didn’t think students were lacking in smart because they were a kid! My favorites listened and also laughed a lot.

Listed below are some all-time favorite teachers from kids’ books. When the librarians in Indianapolis made suggestions for this list – Miss Honey from Matilda was suggested the most often. She gets a gold star!

You might also like taking a look back at Favorite Teachers in Picture Books. I bet you remember Mr. Ratburn and Miss Frizzle! Can you remember what stories they are in or the names of some of the kids in their classes?


Ms. Bixby's Last DayMs. Bixby in Ms. Bixby’s Last Day – Loving their gifted teacher, three boys are dismayed when the teacher falls ill and leaves for the rest of the school year, a situation that compels them to share their stories while cutting class and journeying across town together on a fateful day.


Anne of AvonleaMiss Shirley in Anne of Avonlea – Anne, now sixteen years old and a teacher atAvonlea school, finds that she isn’t much different than her mischievous and spirited pupils.


Because of Mr TerrupMr. Terupt in Because of Mr. Terupt – Seven fifth-graders at Snow Hill School in Connecticut relate how their lives are changed for the better by “rookie teacher” Mr. Terupt. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2012-2013, 4-6 Nominee


Clemetines LetterMr. D’Matz in Clementine’s Letter – Clementine’s beloved teacher, Mr. D’Matz might be leaving for the rest of the year to go on a research trip to Egypt. The only solution, she decides, is to hatch a plan to get Mr. D’Matz back even if it means ruining his once-in-a-lifetime chance.


Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneProfessors Dumbledore, McGonagall, Snape & Hagrid in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – Rescued from the outrageous neglect of his aunt and uncle, a young boy with a great destiny proves his worth while attending Hogwarts School for Wizards and Witches.


Ida BMs. Washington in Ida B. – In Wisconsin, fourth-grader Ida B spends happy hours being home-schooled and playing in her family’s apple orchard, until her mother begins treatment for breast cancer and her parents must sell part of the orchard and send her to public school. A Junior Library Guild selection; Young Hoosier Book Award, 2006-2007, 4-6 Nominee


Junie B AlohahaMr. Scary in the Junie B. Jones, First Grader Aloha-ha-ha! – Junie B. and her family are going on a vacation to Hawaii! And ha! Mr. Scary is giving Junie a real, actual camera to keep a photo journal of her trip! But taking good vacation pictures is not always easy. ‘Cause what if your airplane is full of grouchy ladies? And what if there is an unfortunate inner tube incident at the swimming pool? (And, oh my! Let’s not even mention what happens if a tropical bird gets tangled in your hair!) Will Junie B.’s vacation end up picture perfect? Or will her trip to Hawaii be-horrible?


MockingbirdMrs. Brook in Mockingbird – Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2013-2014, 4-6 Nominee.


Operation YesMiss Loupe in Operation YES by Sara Lewis Holmes In her first ever teaching job, Miss Loupe uses improvisational acting exercises with her sixth-grade students at an Air Force base school, and when she experiences a family tragedy, her previously skeptical class members use what they have learned to help her, her brother, and other wounded soldiers.


Gooney Bird is so AbsurdMrs. Pidgeon in Gooney Bird is so Absurd – Mrs. Pidgeon’s second grade class studies poetry and her students write haiku, couplets, free verse, and finally, a tribute to Mrs. Pidgeon‘s mother organized by the irrepressible Gooney Bird Greene.


Love That DogMiss Stretchberry in Love That Dog – A young student, who comes to love poetry through a personal understanding of what different famous poems mean to him, surprises himself by writing his own inspired poem.


Math CurseMrs. Fibonnaci in Math Curse – When the teacher tells her class that they can think of almost everything as a math problem, one student acquires a math anxiety which becomes a real curse.


MatildaMiss Honey in Matilda – Matilda applies her untapped mental powers to rid the school of the evil, child-hating headmistress, Miss Trunchbull, and restore her nice teacher, Miss Honey, to financial security.


Mr Lincolns WayMr. Lincoln in Mr. Lincoln’s Way – When Mr. Lincoln, “the coolest principal in the whole world,” discovers that Eugene, the school bully, knows a lot about birds, he uses this interest to help Eugene overcome his intolerance.


Science VerseMr. Newton in Science Verse – When the teacher tells his class that they can hear the poetry of science in everything, a student is struck with a curse and begins hearing nothing but science verses that sound very much like some well-known poems.


The Art of Miss ChewMiss Chew in The Art of Miss Chew – Describes how a teacher named Miss Chew encouraged individuality, and accepted learning differences, and helped a young student with academic difficulties get extra time to take tests and permission to be in advanced art classes. Inspired by the author’s memories of her art teacher.


The Secret Life of Mrs FinklemanMiss Finkleman in The Secret Life of Ms Finkleman – Spurred by a special project from her social studies teacher, seventh-grader Bethesda Fielding uncovers the secret identity of her music teacher, which leads to a most unusual concert performance and a tutoring assignment.


Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside SchoolMiss Jewls in Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside School – Join Mrs. Jewls’s class and try solving over fifty math puzzles and brainteasers.


The View from SaturdayMrs. Olinski in The View From Saturday – Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.


The Wednesday WarsMrs. Baker in The Wednesday Wars – During the 1967 school year, on Wednesday afternoons when all his classmates go to either Catechism or Hebrew school, seventh-grader Holling Hoodhood stays in Mrs. Baker’s classroom where they read the plays of William Shakespeare and Holling learns much of value about the world he lives in.


Word After Word After WordMs. Mirabel in Word After Word After Word – A visiting author teaches five friends about the power of wordsand writing. A Junior Library Guild selection


The Year of Miss AgnesMiss Agnes in The Year of Miss Agnes – Ten-year-old Fred (short for Frederika) narrates the story of school and village life among the Athapascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrived as the new teacher.

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Read Thru History: Black History Timeline 1954-1968

Read Thru History: Black History Timeline 1954-1968

More Homework Help
Read Through History: Civil Rights Timeline to 1954
Read Through History: Civil Right Timeline Since 1968

To the Mountaintop was written by Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Charlayne was one of the first black students admitted to the University of Georgia in 1961. In this book, Charlayne tells her own story as well as the stories of other people, children and young adults like her, who played very important roles in the Civil Rights Movement. It is an interesting book because she was so young. We can listen to her own story in her own words. Eyewitness accounts help us experience an event firsthand. We can take a moment to walk in someone else’s shoes. By reading the accounts of people who who were alive at the time, we can empathize with their suffering and understand why the Civil Rights Movement was so important to ensure their safety and freedom.

In To the Mountaintop, one of the people Charlayne talks about is Ruby Bridges, the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Ruby was in elementary school, Charlayne was in college, both were brave enough to do something first. Ruby, in particular, became an icon of the Civil Rights Movement. An icon is a person or Problem We All Live With painting by Norman Rockwellthing that represents something bigger. Ruby was a little girl, but became a symbol of the struggle for Civil Rights for all black people in our country. One of the things that helped make Ruby an icon is this painting by American painter Norman Rockwell. The painting shows Ruby being escorted to school by four US Marshals. Four. It took four law enforcement officers to protect her. That is really hard to understand; that a child would need escorted to school like that. The painting is called “The Problem We All Live With“. In 2011 President Barack Obama arranged to borrow the painting from the Norman Rockwell museum. He had it hung outside the Oval Office and invited Ruby to come see it. Watch this video carefully to hear President Obama say something important:

“I think it’s fair to say that if it hadn’t been for you guys, I might not be here and we wouldn’t be looking at this together.”

He said something very similar during his campaign for President in 2007.

“I’m here because somebody marched. I’m here because you all sacrificed for me. I stand on the shoulders of giants.” ~Speech, Selma Voting Rights March Commemoration in Selma, Alabama, March 4, 2007

Listed below is a timeline of important events of the Civil Rights Movement. These events culminated with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act in 1965. For each event a few books are listed, both fiction and non-fiction, that bring the events and people to life. Take a book walk through history to learn about these fascinating, determined, brave people who stood together so no one stood alone.


1954: Brown Vs. Board of Education was a landmark United States Supreme Court case. The Court declared state laws allowing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. It was a major victory and important turning point for the Civil Rights Movement. The decision by the Court was unanimous (9–0). Unanimous means all of the supreme court justices agreed.


Brown v. Board of Education a Fight for Simple JusticeRemember the Journey to School Integration

1955: The Lynching of Emmett Till

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African-American boy who was murdered in Mississippi in 1955 after allegedly offending a white woman in a grocery store. His killers were acquitted. The trial and acquittal drew attention to the long history of violent persecution of African-Americans in the United States. Emmett’s death became a rallying cry that helped people all over the country realize the critical importance of the Civil Rights Movement.


Midnight Without a Moon

1955-1956: Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a protest against racially segregated seats on the public buses in Montgomery, Alabama. It sounds very strange today, but back then it was actually illegal for a black person and a white person to sit next to each other on a bus. The bus riding rules up to this point stated that African Americans could not be hired as bus drivers, had to ride in seats at the back of the bus, and had to give up their seat to a white person.The boycott began when Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white person.


Rosa Parks: My StoryRosaThe Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott in PhotographsClaudette Colvin Twice Toward Justice12 Incredible Facts about the Montgomery Bus BoycottBack of the Bus

1957: Little Rock Central High School Integration

The Little Rock Nine was a group of African American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Even though the U.S. Supreme Court had already unanimously said in Brown v. Board of Education that all laws establishing segregated schools were unconstitutional, the students were initially prevented from entering the school. President Eisenhower then sent the 101st Airborne and the Arkansas National Guard to escort the students to school.


The Lions of Little RockThe Little Rock nine: a primary source exploration of the battle for school integrationThe story of the Little Rock Nine and school desegregation in photographsLittle Rock girl 1957 : how a photograph changed the fight for integration

1960: Greensboro, North Carolina Sit Ins 

The Greensboro Sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests against the segregated seating at lunch counters in restaurants. In Greensboro, North Carolina, four men sat down at the all-white lunch counter but no one would take their order. They sat quietly until the counter closed. The next day, joined by more people, they did the same thing. More people joined each day at more restaurants and in more cities. Sales at the boycotted stores went way down and gradually, the stores abandoned their segregation rules. Similar protests helped change segregation policies at libraries, beaches, parks, swimming pools and museums. When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 finally passed, it ordered desegregation of all public places.


Sit-in : how four friends stood up by sitting downFreedom on the MenuMake a ChangeThese HandsSeeds of Freedom

1960: Ruby Bridges New Orleans, Louisiana

Ruby Bridges was the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in Louisiana in 1960. Bridges and her mother were escorted to school by four federal marshals for the entire school year.


The Story of Ruby BridgesThrough My Eyes

1961: Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders were people who rode on buses to protest segregated seating. The United States Supreme Court had already ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional, but the law was not enforced. In protest, mixed racial groups rode the buses together to challenge the rules. The riders drew attention to the states that were not following federal law.


Night on FirePreaching to the ChickensThe story of the civil rights freedom rides in photographsShe Stood for Freedom

1963: Birmingham Children’s March

Birmingham Children’s March was a march by hundreds of school children in Birmingham, Alabama, May 2–5, 1963. The children left school and walked downtown to talk to the mayor about segregation. Many children were arrested. Fire hoses and police dogs were used to stop the march. This event compelled President Kennedy to publicly support federal civil rights legislation and led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.


The Youngest MarcherWe've Got a JobBirmingham 1963When the Children Marched

1963: March on Washington

The March on Washington took place in Washington D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to stand up for civil rights for African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. The march helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Voices from the March on WashingtonAs Good As AnybodyWe MarchI Have a DreamMarch On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the WorldMartin's Dream DayThe March on Washington Primary Source ExplorationThe Story of the Civil Rights March on Washington in PhotographsMarching for Freedom

1963: 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing occurred at the African-American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on Sunday, September 15, 1963. Four members of the Ku Klux Klan planted a bomb beneath the steps at the church, killing four little girls and injuring 22 others.


A Thousand Never EversThe Watsons Go to BirminghamBirmingham Sunday

1964: Civil Rights Act

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.


Glory BeThe Civil Rights Act of 1964 a Primary Source Exploration>Freedom SummerFreedom Summer

1965: Voting Marches & the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Selma to Montgomery Voting Marches were three protest marches along the 54-mile highway from Selma, Alabama to the state capital, Montgomery, Alabama. The marches were organized to support African-American citizens who wanted to exercise their constitutional right to vote. The marches contributed to the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, federal legislation that prohibits racial discrimination in voting.


The Story of the Selma Voting Rights Marches in PhotographsBlood BrotherTurning 15 on the Road to FreedomRevolutionLillian's Right to VoteGranddaddy's TurnBecause They Marched

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Classic /ˈklasik/ Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind. Ex. “a classic novel”

If you were alive in 1917 when Central Library was built, this is what one of the bookcases in the children’s section might have looked like.

Listed below are 50 books for kids published before 1917 that were on the shelves back then. These books are classics, having stood the test of time. They have been favorites for more than 100 years! Click on any book jacket to read the book right now! You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free! You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Tom SawyerAesop's FablesAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAnne of Green GablesThe Arabian NightsBlack BeautyThe Blue Fairy BookThe Call of the WildA Christmas CarolCinderellaGrimm's Fairy TalesGulliver's TravelsHans BrinkerHans Christian Andersen StoriesHeidiJack and the BeanstackThe Journey to the Centre of the EarthThe Jungle BookKidnappedThe Legend of Sleepy HollowThe Little PrincessLittle WomenThe Merry Adventures of Robin HoodNights with Uncle RemusOliver TwistPeter and WendyPeter RabbitThe Pied Piper of HamlinPinocchioPollyanna width=The Princess and the GoblinRebecca of Sunnybrook FarmRip Van WinkleRobinson CrusoeThe Secret GardenSnow WhiteThe Story of the Champions of the Round TableThe Story of the Three PigsThe Swiss Family RobinsonThe Tales of Mother GooseThe Nutcracker and the Mouse KingThe Three MusketeersThrough the Looking GlassTreasure IslandTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the SeaA Visit from Saint NicholasWhite FangThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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