Tag Archives: Chemistry

Science Experiment: Miscible Molecules – Lava Bottle

Science Experiment: Miscible Molecules – Lava Bottle

Explore Atoms and Molecules

Sometimes when atoms come together to form a molecule one end of the molecule has a positive charge and one end of the molecule has a negative charge. When this happens the molecule is called a polar molecule. Molecules that do not have two different electrical poles are called non-polar molecules.

This experiment will  show you how polar molecules and non-polar molecules behave when added together. If two kinds of molecules are added together that are both polar molecules, they will mix. They are miscible. Miscible means that the two things can mix together. If two non-polar molecules are added together they will also mix and are miscible. However, if a non-polar molecule and a polar molecule are added together, they will NOT mix together. This is called imiscible. Imiscible means that the two kinds of molecules CANNOT mix together.

What You Need:srpalkaseltzerdog

  • Plastic Bottle
  • Water
  • Vegetable Oil
  • Food coloring
  • Measuring Cups
  • Alka Seltzer

Fill the bottle about 3/4 of the way up with vegetable oil. Fill the bottle the rest of the way up with water. Now add some drops of food coloring. Close the cap on the bottle and shake it up. What happens?

Break the alka seltzer tablet in half. Open the bottle and drop in one half. What happens? Once the bubbles settle down drop in the other half. What happens again?

Water is a polar molecule. Vegetable oil is a non-polar molecule. These two substances do not mix together, they are imiscible (they will not mix together). That’s why you see the blobs of water bobbing around in the oil. Food coloring is a polar molecule so it WILL mix with the water. The water and the food coloring are both polar molecules and will mix together. That’s why the water blobs turn the color of the food coloring and the oil does not.

The alka seltzer just makes the bottle more fun because it makes the colorful water blobs move without shaking the bottle. The alka seltzer tablets dissolve in the the water and make carbon dioxide gas (like we saw vinegar and baking soda do in the Exploding Ziploc experiment). The carbon dioxide gas bubbles attach to the colorful water blobs and make them float to the top of the bottle. When the gas bubbles pop there is no gas bubble to hold up the water blob, so it slowly floats back down to the bottom of the bottle.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Science in Context: Molecules is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. The Science in Context database will show you articles, images and videos to help you learn about molecules.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.

 


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Atomic and Molecular StructureAtoms and MoleculesAtoms and MoleculesMixtures and SolutionsWhat Do You Know About Atoms and Molecules
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Science Experiment: Chromatography – Black Ink

Science Experiment: Chromatography – Black Ink

Crazy Concoctions

srpchromsetupIf you mix one substance with another substance you get a mixture. Lemonade would be an example. Or cookie dough! Pen ink is also a mixture. It has more than one substance in it. In this experiment you will see that it is possible to UNmix a mixture too. This is called chromatography. Chromatography is separating the parts of a mixture so that you can see each one by itself. In this experiment you will find out something surprising about what mixes together to make black ink.

What You Need:

  • Paper Towel or Coffee Filter
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Several different kinds of black markers

Cut strips from the paper towel about 1 inch wide – one for each type of srpchrombowlmarker. Scribble across the bottom of one of the paper towel strips with each kind of marker. Scribble about one inch from one end of the paper towel strip. Tape the OTHER end of the strip to the maker you used to scribble on that strip. That will help you remember which marker goes with each paper towel strip.

Now hang the paper towel strips above the bowl of water so that only a little bit of the scribble end is in the water. Do not submerge the pen scribbles! Check on the paper towels in an hour. What has happened to the pen marks?

What you see happening on the paper towel strips is chromatography. The color srpchromstripsof the ink in markers is made by mixing different pigments together. A pigment is a substance that makes color, like ink or dye. To make black, several pigments are mixed together. When the end of the paper towel strip is submerged in water the water soaks up through the paper towel. When the water passes through the black ink marks it takes the pigment colors with it. Different colors of pigments travel with the water at different rates because the molecules of some pigments stick to the paper more strongly than others. So, as the water travels it separates the colors. This is called chromatography – separating the parts of a mixture so that you can see them one at a time. Black ink actually looks like a rainbow!


Websites, Activities, Printables:

Science in Context: Chromatography and Mixtures and Solutions is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. The Science in Context database will show you articles, images and videos to help you learn about chromatography.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.

 


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Mix It Up Solutions and MixturesMixtures and Solutions
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Science Experiment: Nucleation – Mentos Volcano

Science Experiment: Nucleation – Mentos Volcano

Pop Sizzle Boom

srpmentosdog
Soda is fizzy because it has carbon dioxide pumped into it at the soda plant. The carbon dioxide bubbles just sit there in the soda until you open the top. When you open the top some of the bubble escape making that “whisssssh” sound.

Each mentos candy has a bunch of pits on the surface. The pits are so small you can barely see them. Under a microscope a mento would look like a golf ball. Those little pits on the surface of the mento are a perfect place for a bubble to form, this is called a nucleation site.

What You Need:

  • Liter of Diet Soda
  • Roll of Mentos Candy

Definitely go outside. Set the liter of soda on a firm surface – a sidewalk will work fine. Quickly – and I mean quickly – add the roll of mentos candy. Stand back!! When you drop the candies in the soda they sink and also start making bubbles in all of those pits. The bubbles form and explode making the soda bubble up and out the top of the soda bottle.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Science in Context: Nucleation is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. The Science in Context database will show you articles, images and videos to help you learn about nucleation.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.

 


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Dad's Book of Awesome Science ExperimentsNaked Eggs and Flying Potatoes
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Science Experiment: Oxidation – Brown Apples

Science Experiment: Oxidation – Brown Apples

Chemical ReactionsA chemical reaction occurs when substances are mixed together and are changed. Sometimes substances mix together and not much happens, at other times the results are dramatic and surprising.srpapple

When you cut open an apple it doesn’t look good for very long does it? After even just a few minutes an apple can start to look brown inside. The apple turns brown because when you cut the apple open you expose what’s inside the apple skin to the air,  which has oxygen in it. Oxidation is a chemical reaction that takes place when a substance combines with oxygen. When apple flesh combines with oxygen it turns brown. The browning of the apple is called oxidation.

Another kind of oxidation you probably have seen is rust. When metal comes in contact with oxygen a chemical reaction takes place – oxidation. In this case the result of oxidation is rust.

What You Need:

  • 3 Apple Slices
  • 1 Orange Slice
  • 1/2 Cup Orange Juice
  • 3 Small Plates
  • Carmel Dip and the Rest of the Apple Slices (optional)

Put one apple slice on each plate. One apple slice leave alone. Pour the orange juice over one apple slice, pour orange juice over one apple slice and  lay the orange slice on top of the last apple slice. Wait a couple hours. How do the apple slices compare? Which one is the most brown?  To investigate chemical reactions further – try some more experiments at home!


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Science in Context: oxidation is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. The Science in Context database will show you articles, images and videos to help you learn about oxidation.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Crazy ConcoctionsExploring Kitchen ScienceKitchen Science Lab for KidsScience Experiments that Fizz and Bubble
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Science Experiment: Chemical Reaction – Milk Glue

Science Experiment: Chemical Reaction – Milk Glue

Chemical Reactions

A chemical reaction occurs when substances are mixed together and are changed. Sometimes substances mix together and not much happens, at other times the results are dramatic or just surprising, like in this demonstration. In this one you will mix two things together to make something that looks and acts totally different than the two things you started with! You can probably find the things you need to try this one yourself at home!

What You Need:

  • Milk
  • Vinegar
  • Baking Soda
  • Coffee Filter or Paper Towel
  • 2 Large Cups
  • Bowl
  • Spoon

Pour 1/2 cup of milk into a large cup. Add 2 teaspoons srpmilkglassvinegar. Mix. Place a coffee filter or paper towel over a second large cup. The coffee filter should sag a little bit to make a little filter bowl. Put a rubber band around the top of the cup so it holds the coffee filter in place. Now pour the milk/vinegar mixture into the filter bowl you made.

Let the liquid part of the mixture drip through the filter. This might take awhile. When the liquid is done dripping use a spoon to scrape the milky lumps off the coffee filter and into a bowl. Add 1/4 teaspoon baking soda to the lumps and mix. Is this substance getting sticky? Try it out – can you use it to glue two pieces of paper together?

What happened? When the milk and vinegar (an acid) mix together a chemical reaction takes place. A substance called Casein forms. Casein is a very long molecule that bends like plastic – that’s why the lumps of milk are pliable and bendy. When you add baking soda (a base) to the milk lumps another chemical reaction happens turning the milk lumps sticky, like glue!

Science Experiment Idea: Make three batches of milk glue, but make the variable (the thing you change) the amount of baking soda you add to the mixture. If you add 1/8 teaspoon baking soda to one batch, 1/4 teaspoon baking soda to one batch and 1/2 teaspoon baking soda to one batch, which one will be the most sticky? Why do you think so? To investigate chemical reactions further – try some more experiments at home!


Websites, Activities, Printables:


Science in Context: Chemical Reactions is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. The Science in Context database will show you articles, images and videos to help you learn about chemical reactions.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Crazy ConcoctionsExploring Kitchen ScienceKitchen Science Lab for KidsScience Experiments that Fizz and Bubble
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