Tag Archives: Earth Science

Identifying Leaves

Identifying Leaves

Have you been assigned making a leaf collection yet? If you have started your collection already but haven’t identified the leaves yet, here are some websites and books that will help you figure out the names of the trees your leaves came from. If you haven’t started collecting yet Butler University and Crown Hill Cemetery right here in Indianapolis are great places to get started. They each provide printable maps and information to make your visit successful.

Websites:


Local Places to Find Leaves:

If you haven’t started your collection yet or want to add to what you already have, there are two great places you can go in Indianapolis to find leaves, Crown Hill Cemetery and Butler University. Both places have websites you can go to for maps and directions. They even label the trees so that you know for sure what kind of leaf you have. Put on some old shoes and go on a leaf hike. The sun is shining, you get a map, the trees are labelled – Easy A!

Crown Hill Cemetery Logo

Crown Hill Cemetery
700 West 38th Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208
Phone: 317-925-3800

Butler University
4600 Sunset Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46208
Phone: 317-940-9413 or 317-940-8302

  • Butler University Friesner Herbarium Tree Walk

 

Memorial Stadium, Indiana State University
3300 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47803101 Trees of Indiana
The “Indiana Veterans Memorial Mile” is a one mile walking trail around Indiana State University’s Memorial Stadium located at Wabash and Brown Avenues on the Historic National Road.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Native Trees of the Midwest20 Ways to Draw a Tree101 Trees of IndianaGolden Guide to Familiar American TreesDeep RootsFirst Field Guide to TreesStrange TreesSuper Simple Leaf ProjectsTell Me TreeTree a FableTreeTreesTreesTrees of IndianaFrom Apple Trees to Cider Please
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Meteor Showers

Meteor Showers

National Geographic Kids Meteors

Have you ever seen a “shooting” or “falling” star? These streaks of light are not actually stars at all, but space rocks falling through the earth’s atmosphere. These rocks are called meteoroids or meteors. As the meteor falls it rubs against particle’s in the earth’s atmosphere which creates friction, making the meteor extremely hot. Usually, the meteors become so hot they burn up and disappear before hitting the earth. The flame of that burning up is what we see and what makes meteors look like a star falling out of the sky. If a meteor does survive its journey through the atmosphere and lands on the earth, it is called a meteorite.

At certain times of year we can see a lot of meteors all at once because the earth is passing through a field of space rocks. These times of year are called “meteor showers” because so many space rocks are falling through the earth’s atmosphere at one time. Each year in late summer the Earth passes through a trail of dust and debris left by an ancient comet called Comet Swift-Tuttle. This creates a lot of meteors and is called the Perseid Meteor Shower because the meteors look like they are coming from the constellation Perseus.

In 2019 the Perseid Meteor Shower will occur from July 23 to Aug. 20. The peak will be on August 13th. The best way to see meteors is to go outside after dark, lie on your back and look straight up. You might have to wait. Bring a good snack – like popcorn! You  might also like to know about solar eclipses.

TCM Meteor

This meteorite is an Artifact at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“Meteorites are one of the few extraterrestrial, from outer space, materials scientists have to study. Most meteorites found on the ground are iron, which are very dense and appear quite different from ordinary rock. This is a Gibeon meteorite made up mostly of iron and nickel. These meteorites resulted in a huge meteor shower that occurred thousands of years ago. Upon hitting he earth’s atmosphere, a large iron mass (or masses) fragmented, showering down to Earth. These fragments were first reported in 1838, with more fragments showing up in following years as Europeans moved in.”


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Science in Context: Comets, Meteors & Asteroids is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. Science in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Comets, Meteors & Asteroids.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Shooting StarsAsteroids, Comets and MeteoroidsComets Meteors and AsteroidsHow the Meteorite Got to the MuseumMeteor ShowersShooting StarsMy Friend the StarfinderOlivia Wishes on a StarOne Starry Night
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Garden to Table for Kids

Garden to Table for Kids

The Nitty Gritty Gardening Book Garden to TableYou don’t need a lot of space to plant a garden. You can plant in containers and set them out on your porch or patio, or even put them in a sunny window. These books will help you get started thinking about what to try first. You can follow easy step-by-step directions for planting, watering and harvesting. Listed below are even more books to help you start learning about gardening and using home grown food in recipes.

Do you know what would be even better? Getting good at this so you can EAT what you have grown! Fill your plate with fresh, self-sustained produce that comes straight from your garden.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Gardening Lab for KidsGrow Raise CatchKids Container GardeningOutdoor Science LabSquare Foot GardeningBackyard CookbookCooking and Gardening ProjectsEat Your GreensFrom Field to PlateGrow with Me TomatoA Kid's Guide to Keeping ChickensLet's GardenFirst Gardening BookPick Pull SnapUltimate Guide to GardeningLet's Eat Sustainable FoodHow to Grow a GardenDown to Earth, How Kids Help Feed the WorldOur School GardenFrom Farm to TablePotatoes on Rooftops
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Solar Eclipses

Solar Eclipses

Cool Astronomy shows you 50 ways to enjoy the sky. A solar eclipse is when the moon  passes between the earth and the sun. When this happens the moon blocks the sun. If it is a total eclipse, the sun is completely covered up. If it is partial eclipse, only part of the sun is covered up.

One of the things you can learn in this book is how to watch a solar eclipse safely. This is really important to know because watching a solar eclipse incorrectly can hurt your eyes. Your retina can actually get burned by the sun. You can get “eclipse blindness”. “Eclipse blindness” can go away, or if it is bad enough, can be permanent. What makes “eclipse blindness” especially dangerous is that there are no nerves in the retina of your eye and you will not feel yourself being hurt. You will only notice later when you can’t see right, but the damage to your eye will already done. So please read Exploratoriuam: How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely. Observe, but do it the right way!

You might also like learning about the Perseid Meteor Shower.


Video on the Sun & Viewing Solar Eclipses Safely:


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Science in Context: Eclipses is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home, Login using your library card number. Science in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about eclipses.​

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Solar and Lunar EclipsesEclipsesLooking Up Looking Up!Book jacket for Missile Mouse Rescue on Tankium 3The True Meaning of SmekdayThe Dead GentlemanAmulet The StonekeeperBook jacket for Zita the Space GirlBook jacket for Every Soul a StarBook jacket for Boom!CosmicThe Search for Wondla
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Biomes

Biomes

A habitat is the natural place a plant or animal lives. If a habitat changes so that a plant or animal can’t live there anymore and survive, the species of plant or animal either adapts (changes) or moves. Examples of habitats are a cave, a tree stump or a pond. A biome is an area on earth that has a particular kind of climate that supports certain plants and animals. For instance, for a raccoon, a hollow tree might be its habitat. The tree itself is in the forest biome. The forest biome is the place on earth that has the right soil and temperatures for trees to grow.

Amazing Biome Projects You Can Build Yourself you can find out about major biomes on earth and then you can go one step further – you can build a biome yourself; make a volcano that actually erupts and watch a tornado form inside a bottle. My favorite because I like plants, is the terrarium. A terrarium is a little garden inside a closed glass container. Once you make it you can put some water in it and close the lid. Believe it or not, the water cycle will start to happen after a few days in the sun and “rain” will collect on the side of the glass and “fall” again. Try it yourself: DIY Terrarium

Listed below are books and websites that will help you with your science homework about biomes. Earth is a big place. There are a lot of them! Use this page to help you get started.

Websites, Activities, Printables & Databases:

Science in Context: Biomes is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your library card number. Science in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Biomes.​

 

 

 

You can also ask a math and science expert for homework help by calling the Ask Rose Homework Hotline. They provide FREE math and science homework help to Indiana students in grades 6-12.

 


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Understanding BiomesEcosystems>How Ecosystems Work

Arctic Tundra:

Arctic Tundra Websites:

Arctic Tundra Books:

Arctic TundraCounting TundraThe Frozen Tundra24 Hours on the Tundra

Desert:

FREE Desert eBooks:

The DesertGreat Green GiantsSpring Comes to the Desert

Desert Websites:

Desert Books:

Counting the DesertDeserts and SemidesertsThe Dry Desert

Forest:

FREE Forest eBooks:

TreesGeneral Sherman

Forest Websites:

Forest Books:

Counting ForestConiferous ForestTemperate ForestThe Temperate Forest

Rain Forest:

Rain Forest Websites:

Counting the Rain ForestRain ForestsTropical ForestsThe Tropical Rain Forest

Ocean:

FREE Ocean eBooks:

Ocean BestiesWho Is In the Ocean?

Ocean Websites:

Ocean Books:

Counting the OceanOceans and BeachesThe Seashore

Coral Reef:

Coral Reef Websites:

Coral Reef Books:

The Coral ReefCoral Reef24 Hours on a Coral Reef

Freshwater:

Freshwater Websites:

Freshwater Books:

Rivers Lakes and StreamsLakes and RiversFresh WatersExplore Rivers and Ponds

Mountains:

Mountain Websites:

Mountain Books:

MountainsMountains and HighlandsMountains 2Mountains 3

Wetlands, Marshes & Swamps:

Wetlands, Marshes & Swamps:

Wetlands, Marshes & Swamps Books:

WetlandsMarshes and Swamps24 Hours on the WetlandsMarshes and Swamps 2

Grasslands & Savannas:

Grassland & Savanna Websites:

Grassland & Savanna Books:

Temperate GrasslandsTropical GrasslandsGrasslands Sweeping SavannasThe Wide Open Grasslands

Taiga (Boreal Forest):

Taiga Websites:

Taiga Books:

The Forested TaigaTaigaBoreal Forests

Chapparal:

Chapparal Websites:

Chapparal Books:

ShrublandsChaparral and Scrub

Estuaries:

Estuary Websites:

Estuary Books:

EstuariesA Journey Into An Estuary
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