Tag Archives: History

Unique Stories about U.S. Presidents

Unique Stories about U.S. Presidents

More Homework Help – History & Social Studies

The Camping Trip That Changed America

The Camping Trip That Changed America is the story of a very important adventure in the great outdoors. In 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt asked naturalist John Muir to take him camping. Roosevelt was so ready to get lost in the woods he ordered all of his aids away. The two men hiked and camped alone in the redwoods of Yosemite. Muir talked about the geology and the animals and the things he felt endangered them. President Roosevelt watched and listened. When he returned to Washington, President Roosevelt got to work.

In 1905 President Theodore Roosevelt established the U.S. Forest Service. Their spokesperson is someone you might know – Smokey the Bear! The books listed below will feature more unique and interesting stories about our presidents, their families and their time in office.


Whie House WinnersWhite House Winners – Provides facts and trivia about the United States presidents, including George Washington’s false teeth, James Madison’s love of ice cream, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s stamp collection, and Lyndon B. Johnson’s amphibious car.


Weird But True US PresidentsWeird But True US Presidents – What’s so weird about U.S. presidents? Plenty! Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was a great wrestler? That Ulysses S. Grant got a speeding ticket riding his horse–twice! Or that Benjamin Harrison was afraid of electricity? And let’s not forget that President McKinley had a pet parrot that whistled ‘Yankee Doodle Dandy’ duets with him! In this new single-subject Weird But True book, you’ll have a blast learning that there’s a lot of substance–and weirdness–in every president’s past.


Hanging Off Jefferson's NoseHanging off Jefferson’s Nose: Growing up on Mount Rushmore – Lincoln Borglum was a young boy when his father, the great sculptor Gutzon Borglum, suggested to a group of South Dakota businessmen that he should carve the faces of four presidents into a side of a mountain as an attraction for tourists. But Mount Rushmore would never be finished by Gutzon. It would be his son who would complete the fourteen-year task and present America with one of its most iconic symbols.


What To Do About AliceWhat to do About Alice?: How Alice Roosevelt Broke the Rules, Charmed the World, and Drove her Father Teddy Crazy! – A brief biography in pictures and simple text of Alice Roosevelt, the daughter of Theodore Roosevelt and his first wife.


Hot Dog! Eleanor Roosevelt Throws a PicnicHot Dog!: Eleanor Roosevelt Throws a Picnic – In June of 1939, British monarchs King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visit America, the first visit ever by reigning British royalty. As part of the festivities, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt hosts an all-American picnic that includes hot dogs, a menu item that shocked some people!


What's the Big Deal About First LadiesWhat’s the Big Deal about First Ladies? – Discusses what made each first lady unique and describes their role, ambitions, and partnerships with their presidential husbands.


Did President Grant Really Get a Ticket for Speeding a Horse Drawn CarriageDid President Grant Really Get a Ticket for Speeding in a Horse-drawn Carriage? – Discusses facts and myths about American presidents, including if Washington cut down a cherry tree, if Lincoln walked twenty miles to school, and if Taft weighed more than an elephant.


White House KidsWhite House Kids: the Perks, Pleasures, Problems, and Pratfalls of the Presidents’ Children – Shares the experiences of growing up in the White House, discusses the good and the bad, and profiles the children that have lived there.


The First PupThe First Pup: the Real Story of How Bo Got to the White House – Once upon a time, a man named Barack Obama ran for president of the United States. On the night of his victory, he made a very important announcement…his daughters would get a puppy!


Mis Lady Bird's WildflowersMiss Lady Bird’s Wildflowers: How a First Lady Changed America – A biography of Lady Bird Johnson who, as the wife of President Lyndon Johnson, reminded citizens about the importance of conserving natural resources and promoted the beautification of cities and highways by planting wildflowers.


First KidsFirst Kids: the True Stories of all the Presidents’ Children – First Kids are, and were, kids like any other, they just lived with parents who happened to be busy running the free world. This book will highlight all of the 43 president’s children leading into their adulthood.


Presidential MisadventuresPresidential Misadventures: Poems that Poke Fun at the Man in Charge – A rollicking collection of presidential poems shares lively facts about the misbehaviors of America’s commanders-in-chief.


Kid PresidentsKid Presidents: True Tales of Childhood from America’s Presidents – Presents twenty stories featuring the United States presidents when they were children, including William Taft’s dance lessons, Lyndon Johnson’s classroom pranks, and Gerald Ford’s struggles with dyslexia.


First MothersFirst Mothers – Profiles of the American presidents’ mothers reveal their achievements while sharing anecdotes and childhood stories, from Thomas Jefferson’s mother’s solo management of a plantation to Abraham Lincoln’s mother’s stint as a wrestler.


The President's Stuck in the BathtubThe President’s Stuck in the Bathtub : Poems about the Presidents – A playful, poetic celebration of lesser-known presidential events and eccentricities reveals such examples as John Quincy Adams’ skinny-dipping forays in the Potomac and Herbert Hoover’s Chinese-language conversations with his wife, in a volume complemented by footnotes and an additional “Presidential Notes and Quotes” section. 10,000 first printing. Jr Lib Guild Premier.


Rutherford B. Who Was He?Rutherford B., Who Was He?: Poems about Our Presidents – Innovative rhymes about America’s 19th president while placing his achievements within the context of his time, incorporating short biographical details and presidential quotes.

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U.S. Civil War

U.S. Civil War

More Homework Help – History & Social StudiesMatthew Brady Records the Civil War

The U.S. Civil War lasted from 1861-1865. It was between the Northern States (the Union) and the Southern States (the Confederacy).

Mathew Brady was a photographer during the U.S. Civil War. At that time cameras were very, very new. Beginning with the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861 and continuing throughout the entire Civil War, Brady photographed the long, bloody Voices of the Civil Warconflict. Matthew Brady Records the Civil War tells his story and shares his photographs that are a valuable historical record. You can look at many of his photographs online at: Library of Congress American Memory: Selected Civil War Photographs.

Looking at the photographs will give you an idea of the time and place. If you read Voices of the Civil War, Brady’s photographs will come to life. In it you can read the diaries or letters of a Confederate soldier, a Union Marine, a Confederate doctor, a Union Colonel, a Confederate Ranger and a slave who was freed after the war.

By reading about an event from the perspective of different people, you can get a more well-rounded idea of what that event or time period was really like. You can do the same thing by reading books that tell you about the different people, customs and events of a certain time period. Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the U.S. Civil War.

To give you a start looking at what a soldier’s life was like during the Civil War, here is a Hardee Hat that was authorized for use in 1858, and nicknamed after the future Confederate general who sat on the board to choose the style. The light blue cord signified the wearer as a member of the infantry.

More U.S. Civil War Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

U.S. History in Context: U.S. Civil War is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the U.S. Civil War.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about the U.S. Civil War is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the U.S. Civil War. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

50 Things You Should Know About the Civil WarEyewitness Civil WarAfrican-Americans in the Civil WarGuts and Glory the American Civil WarLincoln's Gettysburg AddressBlast Back the Civil WarHarriet Tubman Secret AgentHoopskirts, Union Blues & Confederate GraysLincoln an AutobiographyLincoln Tells a JokeMarching to AppolattoxMary Bowser and the Civil War Spy RingNurse Soldier SpyThe Civil WarYou Wouldn't Want to be a Civil War SoldierSoldier Song a True Story of the Civil WarAcross Five AprilsThe Red Badge of CourageThe Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. FiggJohn Lincoln Clem Civil War Drummer BoyPink and SaySilent Witness a True Story of the Civil WarWatcher in the Piney WoodsSilent Thunder

Indiana:

Focus on Indiana

Edward Black’s Drum This drum was carried by Edward Black (1853-1871) of Indianapolis. Edward is believed to have been the youngest Civil War soldier. He enlisted as a drummer boy on July 24, 1861 in the 1st Regiment, 21st Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was eight years and almost two months old. He is buried in Crown Hill cemetery in IndianapolisEdward Black’s Cemetery Marker & Biography

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Women’s History: Scientists, Inventors & Doctors

Women’s History: Scientists, Inventors & Doctors

More Homework Help: Women’s History

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea is the story of someone solving a mystery right here on earth. She didn’t have to go to the moon she just had to figure out how to “see” the bottom of the ocean! Marie Tharp was an innovative scientist and the first person to ever successfully draw an accurate map the ocean floor.

Choose more books on this page about pioneering female scientists, astronauts, doctors and inventors.

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Ada LovelaceAda's IdeasCounting on KatherineGrace Hopper Queen of Computer CodeHidden FiguresMargaret and the MoonMarie CurieNothing Stopped SophieThe Girl Who Drew ButterfliesThe Girl Who Thought in PicturesAda Lovelace Poet of ScienceTo the StarsIn the BagJulia Morgan Built a CastleLook UpMae JemisonMarvelous MattieMary Walker Wears the PantsOf Numbers and StarsSally RideSpic and SpanStone Girl Bone GirlTemple GrandinWho Says Women Cant Be Doctors

Group Biographies:

Galaxy GirlsWomen Scientists in ChemistryAfrican America Women Scientists and InventorsGirls Think of EverythingMagnificent MindsPure GritRemarkable MindsThe Sky's the LimitTop 101 Women of STEMTrailblazersWomen in SpaceWomen in ScienceWomen of Steel and StoneYes She Did Medicine
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The Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Movement

More Black History

Claudette ColvinFeatured Civil Rights Activist: Claudette Colvin grew up in Alabama in the 1940s and 1950s. At that time, Jim Crow rules dominated her life. Jim Crow rules were designed to keep black people and white people separated. These are the rules that said black people could not eat in certain restaurants or sit in certain seats on a city bus. When Claudette was 15 years old she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white person, so she was arrested. You’re probably thinking, no, that was Rosa Parks. It’s true, Rosa Parks did the same thing, but Claudette did it too! A lawsuit was filed on behalf of several people, including Claudette and Rosa, to end bus segregation, and eventually, they won. Rosa is more well known, but Claudette was right there too, and she was just a kid! Reading her story helps you understand that it took lots of people, young and old, to change the Jim Crow rules. A lot of people were brave enough to stand up and say, “no more!”

This book includes interviews with Claudette herself, so you get the story straight from her. She talks about what it felt like to live with Jim Crow; to constantly be told, “you can’t”. When you hear a real person talking about it, it seems much more real than reading a plain description. Claudette was there and she can speak for herself. If you like reading about Claudette, try Marching For Freedom. That one tells the story of kids who marched in Selma, Alabama to help win black people the right to vote. It’s really good too and includes interviews with people who were kids back then and were actually there.


Indiana History and Civil Rights:

FocusOnIndianaSmall

If you like Claudette’s story you might like finding out about a strong Hoosier woman who fought for her rights. When Indiana became a state in 1816, the constitution stated, “there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude.” In early 1816, Mary Bateman Clark, a slave in Kentucky, was sold and brought to Knox County, Indiana, as an “indentured servant.” In 1821 Clark filed suit for her freedom. The Knox County Circuit Court ruled against Clark’s petition to end her indentured servitude. Clark appealed to the Indiana Supreme Court, which ruled that Clark’s status was clearly not voluntary. The court awarded Clark her freedom and in doing so set a precedent for freedom for other indentured blacks held in Indiana.


Websites, Activities & Printables:


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

We've Got a JobTwo FriendsSit InThe Civil Rights Act of 1964She Stood for FreedomSeeds of FreedomMiles to Go for FreedomMartin's Dream DayMarching for FreedomBlood BrotherI Have a DreamPreaching to the Chickens

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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U.S. Revolution

U.S. Revolution

More Homework Help – History & Social Studies

Eyewitness American Revolution The U.S. Revolution lasted from 1775-1783. It is also called The Revolutionary War, the America Revolution or The War for Independence. It was fought between Great Britain and the 13 Colonies. By its end, America was recognized as an independent nation.

Eyewitness: American Revolution will give you facts about the people, battles, and events of America’s battle for independence. In it you can get a good idea about  what daily life was like for every day people as well as the soldiers.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the U.S. Revolution. To give you a start looking at what life was like back then, here is an actual Artifact from The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“This cartridge box is made of leather and wood and was used during the Revolutionary War. It held ammunition for a soldier fighting for independence from England.” More Revolutionary Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites:

U.S. History in Context: U.S. Revolution is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your library card number. It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the U.S. Revolution.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about the U.S. Revolution is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your library card number. Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the U.S. Revolution. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

The Thrifty Guide to the American RevolutionFact Tracker American RevolutionGuts and Glory the American RevolutionA Spy Called JamesAmerica's Tea PartiesAmerica's Cry for FreedomBlast Back the American RevolutionDressing a Nation Petticoats and Frock CoatsFounding MothersGeorgeGingerbread for LibertyHanukkah at Valley ForgeHenry and the CannonsIf You Were a Kid During the American RevolutionIndependent DamesLiberty or DeathRebel with a CauseRemember Valley ForgeRevolutionary FriendsThe Black Regiment of the American RevolutionThe Good Fights Feuds of the Founding FathersVoices of the American RevolutionWeapons Gear and Uniforms of the American RevolutionWomen Heroes of the American RevolutionAmerica's Black FoundersChainsForgeAshesBen's RevolutionJohnny TremainMr. Revere and IMy Brother Sam is Dead

Focus on Indiana

Indiana & the U.S. Revolution:

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