Tag Archives: History

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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Homework Help: Explorers

Homework Help: Explorers

More Homework Help

 

Do you think you have what it takes to be a trailblazer? In the Ultimate Explorer Guide, follow along as modern day explorers unearth ancient mummies, encounter wild animals and use the latest technologies in space travel. This book features explorers of all kinds: paleontologists, biologists, photographers, artists, conservationists, and more. 

An explorer is someone who investigates the unknown or unfamiliar in order to learn about it. The unknown can be geographic (a place) or it can be an experience or idea. Because they go where others haven’t, geographic explorers are often associated with certain personality traits like bravery, confidence and curiosity. Their adventures make great stories!

There are many well known explorers from history, especially from the period know as the age of exploration when the earth was not fully explored or mapped yet. This was the time of Columbus, de Soto, Magellan and many more. In the following centuries humans added the exploration of space. The first space explorers are well known too – Armstrong, Glenn, Shepard & Aldrin.

Use the resources on this page to learn about the explorers of the past as well as those today who continue to discover new frontiers on earth and beyond. You can also learn about the tools and technologies explorers have used to help them navigate to new and unexplored places.

The device on the right is called an octant. It is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. “An octant is a navigational tool that is similar to a sextant. It was used mostly to determine latitude at sea. It measures angles by observing the sun or stars and the horizon in reflecting mirrors. It is called an octant because the maximum angle it can measure is one-eighth of a circle, or 45°. This octant was made around 1800.”


Websites, Activities & Printables:

World History in Context LogoWorld History in Context: Age of Exploration is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? World History in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about explorers.

 

Biography in Context: Explorers is another database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about world explorers. Pick a name from their list to learn more about that explorer.​


IndyPLLibraryCard100Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive Logo

eBooks:

Lives of the Explorers Book JacketThe Quest for Z Book JacketI Columbus Book Jacket

Print Books:

Who Was First Book JacketEyewitness Explorer Book JacketAlexander the Great Book JacketAmerican Archaeology Uncovers Vikings Book JacketColumbus Book JacketDown the Colorado Book JacketExploration and Discovery Book JacketExplore the Most Dangerous Journeys of All TimeExplore with Lewis and Clark Book JacketWomen Explorers Book JacketExplorers Book JacketInto the West Book JacketMarco Polo Book JacketSylvia Earle Ocean Explorer Book JacketThe Plant Hunters Book JacketZheng He the Great Chinese Explorer Book JacketByrd and Igloo Book JacketA World of Her Own Book JacketConquistadors Book Jacket
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Homework Help: the 13 Colonies

Homework Help: the 13 Colonies

More Homework Help

 

Colonial Voices is a book of poems written in the voice of a different colonist. Each poem is from a different person’s point of view. If you were interviewing people in colonial times, how might the point of view of an English soldier differ from a cabin boy on a ship or a slave or a blacksmith? By reading about an event from the perspective of different people, you can get a more well-rounded idea of what that event or time period was really like. You can do the same thing by reading books that tell you about the different people, customs and events of a certain time period.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the 13 colonies and the colonial period. To give you a start looking at what life was like back then, here are some colonial items that are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“The purse was made in the late 1700s. 18th century women didn’t carry purses like women of today do—they didn’t carry much in the way of toiletries or money, so they didn’t need to. The woman who owned this would have kept a variety of small objects in this pocketbook, which she could have carried in her pocket (a separate bag worn under her skirt.)”

“This kind of infant’s shirt was known as a waistcoat and was probably worn over another shirt for extra warmth. This one is made of block-printed cotton and lined with linen. It was worn by John H. Hardenbergh when he was born in 1798.”

This tankard and plate are made of pewter. “Pewter was a popular material for dishes until the mid 1800s when glass and pottery became more preferred. Pewter dishes were common in Colonial America, but England kept tight control of the import of the raw tin needed for making pewter, so most pieces were made in England or recast from melted down older pieces.”

More Colonial Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Printables, Crafts & Websites:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: American Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the 13 colonies.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about the 13 Colonies is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the 13 colonies. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

I Walk in DreadPilgrim Voices Our First Year in the New WorldRebekah in DangerA Light in the ForestT

Print Books History:

12 Incredible Facts about the Boston Tea Party Book JacketBlack Stars of Colonial and Revolutionary TimesBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin Breetches Book JacketColonial Comics Book JacketColonial People the Doctor Book JacketColonial Williamsburg Book JacketExplore Colonial America Book JacketJohn Smith Escapes Again Book JacketMolly Pitcher Book JacketPhillis Wheatley Book JacketPocahontas Princess of the New World Book JacketThe Extraordinary Suzy Wright Book JacketThe Mayflower Compact Book JacketThe Mayflower Book JacketThe Scoop on Homes Clothes and Daily Life in Colonial AmericaYou Wouldn't Want to Be an American Colonist Book JacketYour Life as a Settler in Colonial AmericaWomen of Colonial America Book JacketColonial Food Book Jacket

Print Books Stories:

Blue Birds Book JacketThe Courage of Sarah Noble Book JacketThe Witch of Blackbird Pond Book Jacket
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Wait…what did they eat? The History of Food

Wait…what did they eat? The History of Food

What You Never Knew About Fingers Forks and Chopsticks What You Never Knew About Fingers, Forks and Chopsticks takes you on a tour of food and table manners through the ages. Dinner time used to be a whole different experience, and it wasn’t just WHAT they ate, it was HOW they ate it. It was also how they ACTED while eating. The rules about eating with fingers and burping have changed a lot! In the There's a Rat in My Souppast you could wipe your dirty fingers on the tablecloth and nobody thought anything of it and burping was a compliment to the chef! Your mom might not want you to use a time machine to bring some of these customs back, but some of the food people used to eat looks pretty good. Of course some of it doesn’t sound very good at all! How brave are you? There could be a rat in your soup! Try one of these books to take a foodie adventure back in time.


Food History Books:

It's Disgusting and We Ate ItThe World in Your LunchboxGeorge Crum and the Saratoga ChipEat Your US History HomeworkChocolate a Sweet HistoryHasty PuddingDouble CheeseburgersPasta Fried Rice and Matzah Balls Immigrant CookingHot Diggity DogA Fine DessertFood for ThoughtPass the Pandowdy Please

The History of Famous Food Brands:

Ben and JerryCaleb Davis BradhamClarence BirdseyeCoca ColaColonel Harlan SandersDairy QueenDave ThomasEtorrie BojardiFannie in the KitchenHersheysJohn PembertonKraftMilton HersheyRay CrocRobert CadeThe Chocolate Chip Cookie QueenThe Kellogg FamilyThe Mars FamilyTom MonaghanWilliam WrigleyMilton Hershey More Than Chocolate
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Refugees: Their Stories

Refugees: Their Stories

An immigrant is a person who leaves his or her home country to work, study or live in a new country. Sometimes people are immigrants to get an education that is not available in their home country. Sometimes people immigrate to do a particular job or to live in a country whose customs and laws are different than their home country.

A special kind of immigrant is a refugee. Their reasons for leaving their home country are different. A refugee is a person who is fleeing his or her home country to escape danger, like a war, or to escape persecution. Persecution is being hurt based on your race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular group or having a particular political opinion. The United States welcomes many immigrants each year to live and work and study, as well as giving refuge to people who have fled their home country for their own safety. 

The Journey is a story that will help you understand what it is like to have to leave everything you know behind to start over somewhere new.  Below are more books written by, or about, refugees. By reading these books you can live for just a little while, in their experience. I did not grow up afraid. I did not have to worry about living in a war zone, being hurt or being persecuted. I also didn’t want to think about having to move and change schools, let alone thinking about starting a whole new life somewhere and having to learn a new language and new customs and meet all new people. I don’t know what that’s like because I never had to do it. These stories help me see the challenges that refugees face starting a new life – kids facing anxiety and fear and danger with courage. Sometimes you meet new friends in person. Sometimes you meet them in books. Here are some kids I think you will be proud to know.


Non-Fiction:

adrift-at-seaAdrift at Sea: a Vietnamese Boy’s Story of Survival – Tuan and his family survive bullets, a broken motor, and a leaking boat in the long days they spend at sea after fleeing Vietnam. A true story as told to the author by Tuan Ho. Includes family photographs and a historical note about the Vietnamese crisis.


immigrants-and-refugeesImmigrants and Refugees – Describes current patterns of migration around the world, including the causes and effects of immigration and emigration.


the-journey-that-saved-curious-georgeThe Journey That Saved Curious George: the True Wartime Ecape of Margret and H.A. Rey – In 1940, Hans and Margret Rey fled their Paris home as the German army advanced. They began their harrowing journey on bicycles, pedaling to Southern France with children’s book manuscripts, including what would become the international sensation “Curious George,” among their few possessions. This is their dramatic story.


out-of-iraqOut of Iraq Refugees’ Stories in Words, Paintings & Music – Out of Iraq tells the stories of a number of Iraqi refugee families that have made Syria their home over the 5 years since the war in Iraq began. This book tells the stories of their flight from Iraq, the memories of home in the ‘good old days’ and their continued courage living as refugees.


a-song-for-cambodiaA Song for Cambodia – A biography of Arn Chorn-Pond who, as a young boy in 1970s Cambodia, survived the Khmer Rouge killing fields because of his skill on the khim, a traditional instrument, and later went on to help heal others and revive Cambodian music and culture.


Stories:

josephs-big-rideJoseph’s Big Ride – A refugee boy’s determination to ride a bicycle leads to an unexpected friendship.


teacupTeacup – A boy travels across the sea in a rowboat in search of a new home, making a journey that is long and difficult–but also filled with beauty and hope.


calling-the-water-drumCalling the Water Drum – A young boy loses both parents as they attempt to flee Haiti for a better life, and afterward is only able to process his grief and communicate with the outside world through playing the drums.



brothers-in-hope

Brothers in Hope: the Story of the Lost Boys of Sudan
– Eight-year-old Garang, orphaned by a civil war in Sudan, finds the inner strength to help lead other boys as they trek hundreds of miles seeking safety in Ethiopia, then Kenya, and finally in the United States.


four-feet-two-sandalsFour Feet Two Sandals – Two young Afghani girls living in a refugee camp in Pakistan share a precious pair of sandals brought by relief workers.


the-color-of-homeThe Color of Home – Hassan, newly-arrived in the United States and feeling homesick, paints a picture at school that shows his old home in Somalia as well as the reason his family had to leave.


how-i-learned-geographyHow I Learned Geography – As he spends hours studying his father’s world map, a young boy escapes the hunger and misery of refugee life. Based on the author’s childhood in Kazakhstan, where he lived as a Polish refugee during World War II. Newbery Honor Book


when-i-get-olderWhen I Get Older – A Somali-Canadian poet, rapper, singer and songwriter tells his own story about leaving war-torn Somalia as a child, growing up in Canada and creating a hit song that touched millions of people around the world with its powerful message of hope.


how-many-days-to-america-a-thanksgiving-storyHow Many Days to America: a Thanksgiving Story – Refugees from a Caribbean island embark on a dangerous boat trip to America where they have a special reason to celebrate Thanksgiving.


oskar-and-the-eight-blessings

Oskar and the Eight Blessings – A young Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany arrives in New York City on the seventh night of Hanukkah and receives small acts of kindness while exploring the city.


the-journeyThe Journey – What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? A mother and is two brothers away to Miami via the Pedro Pan operation. But when the boys get to Miami, they are thrust into a world where bullies seem to run rampant and it’s not always clear how best to protect themselves.


refugeRefuge – A retelling of the nativity story from a perspective emphasizing the struggle of Mary and Joseph as refugee.


stepping-stonesStepping Stones – In this picture book, a young girl and her family are forced to flee their village to escape the civil war that has engulfed Syria and make their way toward freedom in Europe.


bamboo-peopleBamboo People – Two Burmese boys, one a Karenni refugee and the other the son of an imprisoned Burmese doctor, meet in the jungle and in order to survive they must learn to trust each other. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2012-2013, 6-8 Nominee.


home-of-the-braveHome of the Brave – Kek, an African refugee, is confronted by many strange things at the Minneapolis home of his aunt and cousin, as well as in his fifth grade classroom, and longs for his missing mother, but finds comfort in the company of a cow and her owner. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2009-2010, 6-8 Nominee.


inside-out-and-back-againInside Out and Back Again – Through a series of poems, a young girl chronicles the life-changing year of 1975, when she, her mother, and her brothers leave Vietnam and resettle in Alabama. National Book Award Winner; Young Hoosier Book Award, 2013-2014, 4-6 Nominee; Newbery Honor Book


a-long-walk-to-waterA Long Walk to Water – When the Sudanese civil war reaches his village in 1985, eleven-year-old Salva becomes separated from his family and must walk with other Dinka tribe members through southern Sudan, Ethiopia, and Kenya in search of safe haven. Based on the life of Salva Dut, who, after emigrating to America in 1996, began a project to dig water wells in Sudan. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2012-2013, 6-8 Nominee.


the-only-roadThe Only Road – Twelve-year-old Jaime makes the treacherous journey from his home in Guatemala to his older brother in New Mexico after his cousin is murdered by a drug cartel.


the-red-pencilThe Red Pencil – After her tribal village is attacked by militants, Amira, a young Sudanese girl, must flee to safety at a refugee camp, where she finds hope and the chance to pursue an education in the form of a single red pencil and the friendship and encouragement of a wise elder.


serafinas-promiseSerafina’s Promise – In a poor village outside of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Serafina works hard to help her family, but dreams of going to school and becoming a doctor–then the earthquake hits and Serafina must summon all her courage to find her father and still get medicine for her sick baby brother as she promisedYoung Hoosier Book Award, 2016-2017, 4-6 Nominee.


shooting-kabulShooting Kabul – Escaping from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan in the summer of 2001, eleven-year-old Fadi and his family immigrate to the San Francisco Bay Area, where Fadi schemes to return to the Pakistani refugee camp where his little sister was accidentally left behind. Cybil Award for Middle Grade Nomination 2010.

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