Tag Archives: History

Indiana & Indianapolis Landmarks

Indiana & Indianapolis Landmarks

Websites:

  • The Indianapolis Zoo
  • The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis
  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway History
  • NCAA Hall of Champions
  • College Football Hall of Fame, South Bend
  • Banker’s Life Field House
  • Lucas Oil Stadium
  • George Rogers Clark National Historic Park
  • Levi Coffin House
  • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial
  • James Whitcomb Riley Museum
  • President Benjamin Harrison Home

  • Books:

    Blues Road Trip Hinkle Fieldhouse Historic Hoosier Gyms Little Indiana Small Town Destinations
    Parke County Indianas Covered Bridge Capital Stacks
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    Indiana History

    Indiana History

    Indiana at 200

    If you have Indiana history homework this page will help you get started tracking down facts and finding information about Indiana. Here are some more pages to help you get started:


    Indiana History Artifacts from The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis:

    TCM Logo 150 Artifacts at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis – A collection of photos of 1,000 artifacts from the museum collection – selected objects range over school subjects from Social Studies to Science to Geography with a particular emphasis on Indiana. Browse the Collection
    Madam CJ Walker Wonderful Hair Grower Door Latch to Levi Coffin's House 205 Benjamin Harrison Medal
    Wonderful Hair Grower
    Madam CJ Walker
    Door Latch
    Levi Coffin’s House
    1888 Campaign Ribbon
    Benjamin Harrison

    Books:

    Indiana Bicentennial Indiana Bicentennial 2 Indiana Bicentennial 3 Indiana Bicentennial 4

    Websites:

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    Read Right Now! BLACK HISTORY

    Read Right Now! BLACK HISTORY

    Click on one of the book jackets to hear a story:

    No Mirrors in My Nana's HouseWhite Socks OnlyCatching the MoonHarlemPicture Book of Martin Luther King Jr.

    More FREE Online Reading:


    Websites:


    More Info Guides about Black History:


    To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

    WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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    The Rock and the River

    The Rock and the River

    The Rock and the River

    Teenage brothers Sam and Stick live in Chicago in 1968. Their dad, Rev. Roland Childs, is a respected minister and close friend of Dr. Martin Luther King. Sam’s dad believes passionately in non-violent protest and tirelessly organizes and participates in peaceful protest marches.

    Older brother Stick has begun to question Dr. King’s nonviolent philosophy and has been secretly attending meetings of the Black Panthers, an organization whose philosophies are more aggressive than Dr. King’s and are different from what Rev. Child’s preaches and teaches his boys at home. Sam is torn between the ideas of has father and the ideas of his older brother, both of whom he respects and admires.

    Everybody can relate to being torn between two choices and being torn between the opinions of two people you respect. When it comes down to figuring out what you think for your own self – that’s when things get hard.

    After Dr. King is assassinated and Sam witnesses the brutal beating of a friend by police officers, he becomes more interested in the ideas Stick is learning about at the Black Panther meetings. He begins to attend the meetings also. The conversation the teens have at home, at school, and at these meetings are some of the best parts of the book. They are living the civil rights struggle as they face discrimination every day. Listening to these conversations you get a real sense of each philosophy and why it was chosen by the people committed to it.

    This book has a pretty explosive, surprising ending. It isn’t a book for the faint hearted. These are really hard issues and there is violence in the book. It isn’t a happy story with a happy ending because it’s not that kind of story. It wasn’t a happy time. The book is true to the historical period so the violence is part of the story being told.

    It is hard for Sam and Stick to stand by watching people suffer the injustices of racism. When Sam finds out Leroy, the leader of the student Black Panthers, sneaks away to talk to Rev. Childs, the same way Sam is sneaking off to the Black Panther meetings, he realizes that these issues are hard for everyone. Sam discovers that standing quiet and firm is different than doing nothing and that you can be agressive, without being violent. A really powerful, emotional book. Don’t miss the author’s note at the end – it is a great discussion of the true events, people and groups that appear in this book. Author: Kekla Magoon Award: Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent 2010

    Look Inside The Rock and the River

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    Picture Book Historical Fiction

    Picture Book Historical Fiction

     

    Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride A fictionalized account of the night Amelia Earhart flew Eleanor Roosevelt over Washington, D.C. in an airplane.
    As Fast As Words Could Fly A thirteen-year-old African American boy in 1960s Greenville, North Carolina, uses his typing skills to make a statement as part of the Civil Rights movement.
    Ballywhinney Girl Young Maeve feels a strong connection to the mysterious, mummified body of a young girl that her grandfather uncovers while cutting turf in an Irish bog. Includes facts about bogs and the mummies that have been found in them.
    The Bicycle Man The amazing tricks two American soldiers do on a borrowed bicycle are a fitting finale for the school sports day festivities in a small village in occupied Japan.
    The Blessing Cup A single china cup from a tea set left behind when Jews were forced to leave Russia helps hold a family together through generations of living in America, reminding them of the most important things in life.
    Bobbin Girl A ten-year-old bobbin girl working in a textile mill in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the 1830s, must make a difficult decision–will she participate in the first workers’ strike in Lowell?
    Desmond and the Very Mean Word While riding his new bicycle Desmond is hurt by the mean word yelled at him by a group of boys, but he soon learns that hurting back will not make him feel any better.
    Fish for Jimmy When brothers Taro and Jimmy and their mother are forced to move from their home in California to a Japanese internment camp in the wake of the 1941 Pearl Harbor bombing, Taro daringly escapes the camp to find fresh fish for his grieving brother.
    Follow the Drinking Gourd By following the directions in a song, “The Drinking Gourd,” taught them by an old sailor named Peg Leg Joe, runaway slaves journey north along the Underground Railroad to freedom in Canada.
    In Andal’s House Kumar, a young boy living in present-day India, faces bigotry when he goes to visit a classmate from a higher caste family.
    Keep the lights burning Abbey Relates the real-life saga of Abbie Burgess, who single-handedly kept the lighthouse lamps lit during a four-week winter storm that lashed the coast of Maine in 1856.
    The Kite That Bridged Two Nations Presents a fictionalized version of the story of a young man who won a contest by flying his kite across Niagara Falls and inspired the construction of the first bridge across the span, connecting Canada and the United States.
    Knit Your Bit When his father leaves to fight in World War I, Mikey joins the Central Park Knitting Bee to help knit clothing for soldiers overseas.
    Matchbox Diary Follow a girl’s perusal of her great-grandfather’s collection of matchboxes and small curios that document his poignant immigration journey from Italy to a new country.
    Max Goes to the Moon Max the dog and his friend Tori take the first trip to the Moon since the Apollo missions, inspiring the nations of the world to build a Moon colony. Scientific principles that support the story are clearly explained in “Big Kid Boxes” appearing on each page.
    Miss Rumphius As a child Great-aunt Alice Rumphius resolved that when she grew up she would go to faraway places, live by the sea in her old age, and do something to make the world more beautiful–and she does all those things, the last being the most difficult of all.
    Nasreddine As Nasreddine and his father take dates, wool, chickens, or watermelon to market, people tease them no matter who is riding their donkey, and this causes Nasreddine embarrassment until his father helps him to understand.
    Red Kite, Blue Kite When Tai Shan and his father, Baba, are separated during China’s Cultural Revolution, they are able to stay close by greeting one another every day with flying kites until Baba, like the kites, is free. Includes historical note.
    Welcome to America Champ! In 1945, when young Thomas, his mother, and his new baby brother leave war-torn England to join his stepfather, an American soldier named Jack, in Chicago, Thomas finds a way to give courage to a fellow traveler on the Queen Mary. Includes historical note about war brides.

    Books recommended by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

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