Tag Archives: Indiana

Homework Help: Indiana

Homework Help: Indiana

More Homework Help – History & Social Studies

Choose a topic below to see books, articles & websites to do research and help you find Indiana history homework answers.

Use your IndyPL library card to check out books at one of our locations or to view a database or check out an e-book or e-audiobook at home right to your device. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Indiana Booklists:

What is a Booklist? A booklist is a list of resources about a topic, The booklists here include books, websites, videos and more.

Indiana Databases:

What is a database? A database is a collection of information. Enter a search term to see a list of articles, images, or stories you can read and/or print for homework.

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Author Spotlight: James Whitcomb Riley

Author Spotlight: James Whitcomb Riley

More Homework Help – Indiana

The poet James Whitcomb Riley was born in Greenfield, Indiana on October 7, 1849. To give you an idea how long ago that was, he was about 12 years old when the U.S. Civil War started.  Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell were both born around the same time.

At the time of his death on July 22, 1916, James Whitcomb Riley was a beloved figure in Indiana. He was also well known for writing in dialect. A dialect is a particular form of a language that is special to a specific region, in this case Indiana. It is similar to what we would call an accent today. When a person read his poetry, it was like listening to a neighbor and people really liked that. Many of his poems were funny. People really liked that too. Riley traveled the country giving live shows reading his poetry. In his time, he was a rock star! His death was such news it made front page headlines in major newspapers all across the country. There is an old scrapbook of the events that followed his death at The James Whitcomb Riley Home & Museum. You can look at this scrapbook online. It has all kinds of old newspaper clippings in it. One of the headlines about his funeral says, “35,000 People Pass Casket of Indiana Poet”. That is a lot of people! 

During Riley’s life people did not have radios in their homes yet. To listen to music or readings they used phonographs. In Riley’s day you had to hand crank a machine to listen to a recording. Very early ones recorded onto cylinders. Later ones recorded onto flat discs, like a CD, only larger. Today you can play a digital file of an audiobook on your phone or computer. In 1912 Riley recorded poetry readings for the Victor Talking Machine Company on one of those flat discs so that people could listen at home – an old time audiobook. We have these old Riley Recordings at IndyPL in our digital collection. James Whitcomb Riley Recordings You can listen to the man himself reading his own poetry. Lucky for you they are in a digital file now!

Mr. Riley’s most famous poems for children were and still are, “Raggedy Man,” “The Little Orphant Annie,” “When the Frost is on the Punkin,” and “The Old Swimmin’ Hole.” You can read them right now in these free eBooks from IUPUI. I recommend the deliciously scary “The Little Orphant Annie.” Annie is a great storyteller! She tells the story of why you better mind your parents because “The gobble-uns’ll git you ef you don’t watch out!” To read it click on the green book Riley Child Rhymes and then click on page 23.

Read Right Now! Free eBooks:

Riley Child RhymesThe Book of Joyous ChildrenThe Raggedy Man

 

Websites:

US History in Context

U.S. History in Context: James Whitcomb Riley is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the James Whitcomb Riley.​

 

Indiana Memory

Indiana Memory: James Whitcomb Riley is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Login using your IndyPL library card number. Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the U.S. Civil War. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


In the spirit of another beloved Hoosier, David Letterman:

Top 10 Ways to Know James Whitcomb Riley was a Rock Star of his Time:

10. His book  Rhymes of Childhood was published in 1912. Today, over 100 years later, you can easily find his book at the library or go to an online bookstore and find it for sale as a print book or an eBook. There are not very many books that are still printed from that long ago!

9. In the late 1890s he encouraged the African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. He wrote Dunbar a letter of recommendation that helped get his work published.

8. When Riley died, the President of the United states, Woodrow Wilson, and the Vice-President of the United States, Thomas Riley Marshall (who was from Columbia City, Indiana), both sent messages of condolence to his family. The Governor of Indiana allowed him to be laid in state at The Indiana Statehouse Rotunda so that people could come pay their respects. Until that time, only Abraham Lincoln had been honored in that way.

7. Greenfield, IN, his birthplace, and Indianapolis, IN, his home for over 20 years, fought over where he should be buried. Over Riley’s Dead Body: Indy’s Weirdest Civic Fight. Indianapolis won. He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in a tomb at the top of a hill, the highest point in Indianapolis. Section 61, Lot 1.

6. Both his boyhood home in Greenfield, IN and his adult home in Indianapolis, IN are museums and on the National Register of Historic Places.

5. The James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children was created and named in his honor in 1924. In 1955 the hospital added Camp Riley, a camp for youth with disabilities.

4. In 1940, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 10-cent stamp honoring Riley.

3. A cargo ship, the SS James Whitcomb Riley, was commissioned in 1942 during World War II.

2. There used to be a Hoosier Poet Brand of coffee, oatmeal, vegetables, cigars and more.

1. James Whitcomb Riley donated the land indyPL’s Central Library is built on. The bronze gates at the main entrance on St. Clair Street were purchased with pennies donated by children. The bronze tablets on each of the iron gates say: The gates are the gift of the children of Indianapolis in loving remembrance of their friend James Whitcomb Riley

Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

When the Frost is on the PunkinThe Gobble-uns'll Git You Ef You Don't Watch OutLittle Orphant AnnieHoosier Boy James Whitcomb RileyJames Whitcomb Riley Young Poet
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Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

More Homework Help – Indiana

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Indianapolis’s own John David Anderson has been named the 2017 Indiana Author Award Genre Indy Author Award SealExcellence Winner for Middle Grade Fiction. That’s a long way to say he won an award for writing great books – books kids like – for middle school students. Mr. Anderson is the author of several favorites, including Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, Sidekicked, Minion, Standard Hero Behavior, and The Dungeoneers. A self-proclaimed lover of root beer and chocolate, he lives right here in Indianapolis. You can learn more at www.johndavidanderson.org.Posted

Mr. Anderson’s book Posted is the story about what happens when kids go old-school after having their cell phones taken away. Instead of using texts or social media to communicate with each other they use post-it notes!

Here are some of the many awards Mr. Anderson’s books have received:

Ms. Bixby’s Last Day

  • The Kirkus Prize 2016 Nominee, Young Readers
  • NCTE Charlotte Huck Award for Outstanding Fiction for Children 2017, Honor
  • Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • The New York Times Notable Children’s Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • New York Public Library 2016 Best Books for Kids, Fiction
  • Booklist 2016 Editors’ Choice, Books for Youth, Middle Readers, Fiction
  • ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Middle Readers
  • 2016 Cybils Finalist, Middle Grade Fiction

The Dungeoneers

  • 2015 Cybils Award Finalist

Sidekicked

  • 2013 Cybils Award Finalist

Standard Hero Behavior

  • 2010-2011 Young Hoosier Book Award Nominee
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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

More Homework Help – Indiana

Children's Choir Photo Central Library Opening 1917Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony Time Capsule Opening Central Librarytook place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?Messiah of Nations Sheet Music Photo

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Penny Gates Central Library 1917Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve.

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?Central Library Photo

Librarian's Office Central Library PhotoLibrarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

Book Trucks Central Library 1917State 
Card Catalog Central Library 1917
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

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Young Hoosiers 2017-2018

Young Hoosiers 2017-2018

More Booklists

Here is a list of the 2017-2018 Young Hoosier nominees.

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Picture Book Nominees:

Winner: Tuesday Tucks Me In

Dragon and CaptainTrombone ShortyJob WantedDuncan the Story DragonIzzy & OscarWe Forgot BrockThe Bear ReportMother BruceFinders KeepersLittle Red Gliding HoodA Penguin Named PatienceWeird and Wild Animal FactsNight AnimalsFloatTuesday Tucks Me InKetzel the Cat Who ComposedIf You Ever Want to Take an Alligator to School Don'tThe Bear Ate Your SandwichLittle Red's Riding HoodWhat the Dinosaurs Did Last Night

Intermediate Nominees:

Winner: Roller Girl

Spirit Week ShowdownMy Diary from the Edge of the WorldCrenshawSerafina and the Black CloakBook ScavengerConnect the StarsThe Underground AbductorFinder Coal Mine DogSunny Side UpRoller GirlUnusual Chickens for the Exceptional Chicken FarmerA Handful of StarsFast BreakProject AlphaPaxMesmerizedFuzzy MudLast in a Long Line of RebelsHarriet the InvincibleVoice of Freedom

Middle Grade Nominees:

Winner: Orbiting Jupiter

The FixerThe War That Saved My LifeWalk on Earth a StrangerAll Fall DownThe TestingCode of HonorFish in a TreeTerror at Bottle CreekNight on FireThe Arctic CodeThe Only GameMark of the ThiefThe Seventh Most Important ThingI Am Princess XThe Eighth DayFires of InventionOrbiting JupiterInto the Killing SeasGoodbye StrangerNo Place
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