Tag Archives: Science

Amazing and True Animal Stories

Amazing and True Animal Stories

I’m sure you’ve heard people say that dogs are man’s best friend.Animal Stories When you read some of these books, you’ll discover that there are a lot of animals that have been man’s best friend as well as best friends to each other! Who would have thought that a deer and a dog or a dog and a duck could be friends?

Some of these animals just have the best life stories. Some are famous, like Koko the gorilla that learned Puppy Love True Stories of DevotionAmerican Sign Language. Or the 21 elephants that walked across the Brooklyn Bridge when it was built, just to prove it was safe! Or Eclipse, the dog in Seattle that learned how to catch the bus to the dog park all by himself!

Check out some of these books for amazing stories about some special members of the animal kingdom.


Unlikely Animal Friendships:

Tarra and BellaSuryia and RoscoeOwen and MzeeRickie and HenryOne Big Happy FamilyTwo BobbiesKate and PippinLenore Finds a FriendThe Tiger Cubs and the ChimpUnlikely Friendships The Leopard and the CowUnlikely Friendships The Dog and the PigletUnlikely Friendships The Monkey and the Dove

Loyal Friends to People:

Stubby the War DogFinding WinnieHachiko the True Story of a Loyal DogHelen Keller's Best Friend BelleEmi and the Rhinocerous ScientistLittle Dog LostKoko LoveJack and JillMidnightStep Right UpTuesday Takes Me ThereTuesday Tucks Me InRags Hero Dog of World War IDarling Mercy Dog of World War IFly Cher Ami FlyWar DogsNubsBunny the Brave War HorseHachiko WaitsDadblamed Union Army CowThe Donkey of Gallipoli

Amazing True Animal Stories:

Bob the Railway DogClara the True Story of the Rhinocerous Who Dazzled KingsDog on BoardDozer's RunElephants Can Paint TooHerbertEllie's Long WalkFaithful ElephantsElizabeth Queen of the SeasHope for WinterIvanThe Giraffe That Walked to ParisLily a True Story of CourageLooking for MizaOut of the WoodsQueenieSaving the Baghdad ZooShep Our Most Loyal DogStayJumbo the Most Famous Elephant in the WorldThe World's Greatest ElephantWonder HorseZeraffa Giraffa
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Homework Help: Science Experiments

Homework Help: Science Experiments

2013novScienceFairIdeas

Looking for an idea for a science project? Here are several science experiment ideas that use materials easily found in your house. A couple of them might require a trip to the grocery store or pharmacy, but mostly you can just raid the garage, kitchen or medicine chest for the ingredients. Many experiments you will want to do OUTSIDE. Each experiment will give you directions as well as suggest websites and books that will help you explain what science is at work during the experiment.

Science Project Ideas:

ATOMS & MOLECULES
Atoms: A Bunch of Empty Space
Density: Buoyancy
Density: Layer Column
Density: Marbling Paper
Density: Straw Mix
Miscible Molecules: Lava Bottle
Polymers: Poke Holes in a Ziploc
Polymers: Borax Goo
Polymers: Cornstarch Goo
Saturation: Growing Crystals
Soluability: Sharpie Pen Tie Dye
Supersaturated: Borax Crystals & Rock Candy
Static Electricity: Salt and Pepper Separator
Surface Tension: Pepper Scatter
Surface Tension: Soap Bubbles
Surface Tension: Sand Castles

CHEMICAL REACTIONS
Acids: Bouncing Egg
Acids: Folding Egg
Chemical Bond: Kool Aid Tie Dye
Chemical Reaction: Exploding Ziploc
Chemical Reaction: Penny Cleaner
Chemical Reaction: Plastic Bottle Geyser
Chemical Reaction: Milk Play Dough
Chemical Reaction: Milk Glue
Nucleation: Mentos Volcano
Oxidation: Brown Apples

HEAT
Heat: Fireproof Balloon
Insulators: Blubber Test
Insulators: Keeping Warm
Melting Point: DIY Slushie
Heated Gases Expand: Ivory Soap

PHYSICS
Aerodynamics: Paper Airplanes
Air Pressure: Straw Through an Apple
Air Pressure: Do Not Open Bottle
Centripetal Force: Hex in a Balloon
Centripetal Force: Tornado in a Bottle
Friction: Thick Book Friction
Momentum: Pendulums
Newton’s 1st Law (Inertia): Tablecloth Trick & Egg Drop
Newton’s Second Law: Comet Cratering
Newton’s Third Law: Rocket
Center of Gravity: Fork on a Glass & Balanced Pop Can
Chromatography: Black Ink
Gravity: Stacking
Engineering: Newspaper Geodesic Dome
Engineering: Build a Bridge
Potential & Kinetic Energy: Marshmallow Catapult

BIOLOGY (LIFE)
Cell Respiration: Balloon Blow Up
Hydrologic (Water) Cycle: Make a Terrarium
Transpiration: Flower Transformation

 

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Websites:

Here are some websites that have great step-by-step directions and photographs for planning a great science project.

Databases:

GaleScience Science in Context: This is a database you can look at with your IndyPL Library Card Number and PIN to get Science Experiment ideas and to do background research once you choose a subject. (What’s my PIN?)
science-fair-discoverer-logo Science Fair Discoverer: This is a great way to find experiments that use common around-the-house items.  Search by asking where you want to begin:  In the recycling bin?  In the junk drawer?  In the yard? In the Kitchen? In the Bathroom?   When an experiment is selected, you will see a list of needed items and directions. (What’s my PIN?)

Books:

oh-ickoutdoor-science-labscience-experiments-you-can-eat

Star Wars Science Fair Book 101 Great Science Experiments We Dare You Candy Experiments
Edible Science Hands On Science Experiments Kitchen Science Experiments Ruff Ruffmans 44 Favorite Science Activities
Science Rocks Try This Fizz and Bubble Surprise and Delight
101-coolest-simple-science-experiments diy-science labcraft-wizards maker-lab
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Homework Help: Identifying Leaves in Indianapolis

Homework Help: Identifying Leaves in Indianapolis

Have you been assigned making a leaf collection yet? If you have started your collection already but haven’t identified the leaves yet, here are some websites and books that will help you figure out the names of the trees your leaves came from.

Websites:

Pinterest Logo 25More Websites, Printables & Activities on the IndyPL Kids Pinterest Board: Leaves & Leaf Identification


Local Places to Find Leaves:

If you haven’t started your collection yet or want to add to what you already have, there are two great places you can go in Indianapolis to find leaves, Crown Hill Cemetery and Butler University. Both places have websites you can go to for maps and directions. They even label the trees so that you know for sure what kind of leaf you have. Put on some old shoes and go on a leaf hike. The sun is shining, you get a map, the trees are labelled – Easy A!

Crown Hill Cemetery Logo

700 West 38th Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208
Phone: 317-925-3800

Butler University
4600 Sunset Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46208
Phone: 317-940-9413 or 317-940-8302


101 Trees of Indiana

3300 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47803The “Indiana Veterans Memorial Mile” is a one mile walking trail around Indiana State University’s Memorial Stadium located at Wabash and Brown Avenues on the Historic National Road.


Books:

If you want to check out one of the libary’s tree identification books, don’t wait until the last minute to put one on hold. These go fast! And if you want to read about someone who feels your pain – try Gianna Z, she’s got a leaf collection due also, and if her disorganizatin and procrastination keep her from getting it done, she can’t run in the cross-country sectionals. She is feeling the pressure to find the leaves and identify them before it is too late.

20 Ways to Draw a Tree101 Trees of IndianaGolden Guide to Familiar American TreesDeep RootsFirst Field Guide to TreesStrange TreesSuper Simple Leaf ProjectsTell Me TreeTree a FableTreeTreesTreesTrees of IndianaFrom Apple Trees to Cider Please
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Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Cool Astronomy shows you 50 ways to enjoy the sky. A solar eclipse is when the moon  passes between the earth and the sun. When this happens the moon blocks the sun. If it is a total eclipse, the sun is completely covered up. If it is partial eclipse, only part of the sun is covered up.

One of the things you can learn in this book is how to watch a solar eclipse safely. This is really important to know because watching a solar eclipse incorrectly can hurt your eyes. Your retina can actually get burned by the sun. You can get “eclipse blindness”. “Eclipse blindness” can go away, or if it is bad enough, can be permanent. What makes “eclipse blindness” especially dangerous is that there are no nerves in the retina of your eye and you will not feel yourself being hurt. You will only notice later when you can’t see right, but the damage to your eye will already done. So please read Exploratoriuam: How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely. Observe, but do it the right way!

Here is a library program that will help you have fun learning about solar eclipses.

The Art of the Eclipse

Art of the Eclipse Class Various Branches in August & September School-age children are invited to join Art With a Heart for a program full of art and science inspired by the stars, sun, and moon. Schedule

You might also like learning about the Perseid Meteor Shower.


Video on the Sun & Viewing Solar Eclipses Safely:


Websites:

Science in Context: Eclipses is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Eclipses.​


Books about Solar Eclipses:

Solar and Lunar EclipsesEclipsesLooking Up Looking Up!

Space Stories:

Book jacket for Missile Mouse Rescue on Tankium 3The True Meaning of SmekdayThe Dead GentlemanAmulet The StonekeeperBook jacket for Zita the Space GirlBook jacket for Every Soul a StarBook jacket for Boom!CosmicThe Search for Wondla
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Homework Help: Meteor Showers

Homework Help: Meteor Showers

National Geographic Kids Meteors

Have you ever seen a “shooting” or “falling” star? These streaks of light are not actually stars at all, but space rocks falling through the earth’s atmosphere. These rocks are called meteoroids or meteors. As the meteor falls it rubs against particle’s in the earth’s atmosphere which creates friction, making the meteor extremely hot. Usually, the meteors become so hot they burn up and disappear before hitting the earth. The flame of that burning up is what we see and what makes meteors look like a star falling out of the sky. If a meteor does survive its journey through the atmosphere and lands on the earth, it is called a meteorite.

At certain times of year we can see a lot of meteors all at once because the earth is passing through a field of space rocks. These times of year are called “meteor showers” because so many space rocks are falling through the earth’s atmosphere at one time. Each year in late summer the Earth passes through a trail of dust and debris left by an ancient comet called Comet Swift-Tuttle. This creates a high number of meteors and is called the Perseid Meteor Shower because the meteors appear to come from within the constellation Perseus.

In 2018 the Perseid Meteor Shower will occur from July 17 to Aug. 24. It will peak on August 12th and 13th. The best way to see meteors is to go outside after dark, lie on your back and look straight up. You might have to wait. Bring a good snack – like popcorn! You  might also like to know about solar eclipses.

TCM Meteor

 

This meteorite is an Artifact at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

“Meteorites are one of the few extraterrestrial, from outer space, materials scientists have to study. Most meteorites found on the ground are iron, which are very dense and appear quite different from ordinary rock. This is a Gibeon meteorite made up mostly of iron and nickel. These meteorites resulted in a huge meteor shower that occurred thousands of years ago. Upon hitting he earth’s atmosphere, a large iron mass (or masses) fragmented, showering down to Earth. These fragments were first reported in 1838, with more fragments showing up in following years as Europeans moved in.”

 

 

Websites:

Science in Context: Comets, Meteors & Asteroids is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Comets, Meteors & Asteroids.​


Books:

Comets Meteors and AsteroidsHow the Meteorite Got to the MuseumMeteor ShowersMeteorsNational Geographic Kids MeteorsSeven Wonders of Asteroids Meteors and CometsShooting StarsMeteor!My Friend the StarfinderOlivia Wishes on a StarOne Starry Night
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