Tag Archives: Social Studies

15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum was originally published in 1900. When Central Library opened in 1917 this is what the book looked like then. After more than 100 years it is still a favorite! It’s a classic. That means it has stayed popular for a long time. 100 years is definitely a long time! Listed below are 15 classic children’s books that were on the library shelves in 1917 and are still favorites on the library shelves in 2017.

The book covers on the left show you what the books looked like in 1917. Click on one of the old book jackets to read the book online. You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free!

The book covers on the right show you what the books look like today. Click on one of these newer versions to see it in the computer catalog. You can place a hold there with your library card if you would like to read it. For most of the newer versions just the cover and maybe the illustrations have changed, but for some of them the story has been changed a little to either reflect the times or tell the story in a new way. Try Matt Phelan’s Snow White. It’s a graphic novel version that is really good!

You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at indyPL Kids’: Staying Power – 50 Classic Kids’ Books,  Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Tells the adventures and pranks of a mischievous boy growing up in a Mississippi River town in the early nineteenth century.


Aesop's FablesAesop's FablesAesop’s Fables – Aesop’s wise, witty and timeless fables. The version on the right sets the fables in an African setting.


Alice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Offers the classic tale about a young girl who goes on a fantastical trip after falling into a deep hole where she meets a cast of weird and wonderful creatures along the way.


Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables – Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

 


 

CinderellaCinderellaCinderella – In her haste to flee the palace before the fairy godmother’s magic loses effect, Cinderella leaves behind a glass slipper.


HeidiHeidiHeidi – A Swiss orphan is heartbroken when she must leave her beloved grandfather and their happy home in the mountains to go to school and to care for an invalid girl in the city.

 


 

The Jungle BookThe Jungle BookThe Jungle Book – An anthology of stories chronicles the adventures of Mowgli, a young boy raised by wolves, as he learns the ways of the jungle from Baloo the bear and matches wits with his archenemy, Shere Khan, in a collection that also includes the tale of Rikki-tikki-tavi.


The Little PrincessA Little PrincessA Little Princess – Alone in a new country, wealthy Sara Crewe tries to make friends at boarding school and settle in. But when she learns that she’ll never see her beloved father again, her life is turned upside down. Transformed from princess to pauper, she must swap dancing lessons and luxury for drudgery and a room in the attic. Will she find that kindness and generosity are all the riches she truly needs?


PinocchioPinocchioPinocchio – The adventures of a talking wooden puppet whose nose grows whenever he tells a lie.


The Secret GardenThe Secret GardenThe Secret Garden – A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

 


 

Snow WhiteSnow WhiteSnow White – The story of a beleaguered girl who finds shelter with seven dwarves after the sudden death of her father and suffering cruelty at the hands of her stepmother.


The Story of the Three PigsThe Story of the Three PigsThree Little Pigs – The three pigs and their narrow escape of the wolf.


Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking GlassThrough the Looking Glass – In this sequel to “Alice in Wonderland” Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.


The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows – The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside–Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger.

 


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Read Thru History: Black History Timeline 1954-1968

Read Thru History: Black History Timeline 1954-1968

More Homework Help
Read Through History: Civil Rights Timeline to 1954
Read Through History: Civil Right Timeline Since 1968

To the Mountaintop was written by Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Charlayne was one of the first black students admitted to the University of Georgia in 1961. In this book, Charlayne tells her own story as well as the stories of other people, children and young adults like her, who played very important roles in the Civil Rights Movement. It is an interesting book because she was so young. We can listen to her own story in her own words. Eyewitness accounts help us experience an event firsthand. We can take a moment to walk in someone else’s shoes. By reading the accounts of people who who were alive at the time, we can empathize with their suffering and understand why the Civil Rights Movement was so important to ensure their safety and freedom.

In To the Mountaintop, one of the people Charlayne talks about is Ruby Bridges, the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Ruby was in elementary school, Charlayne was in college, both were brave enough to do something first. Ruby, in particular, became an icon of the Civil Rights Movement. An icon is a person or Problem We All Live With painting by Norman Rockwellthing that represents something bigger. Ruby was a little girl, but became a symbol of the struggle for Civil Rights for all black people in our country. One of the things that helped make Ruby an icon is this painting by American painter Norman Rockwell. The painting shows Ruby being escorted to school by four US Marshals. Four. It took four law enforcement officers to protect her. That is really hard to understand; that a child would need escorted to school like that. The painting is called “The Problem We All Live With“. In 2011 President Barack Obama arranged to borrow the painting from the Norman Rockwell museum. He had it hung outside the Oval Office and invited Ruby to come see it. Watch this video carefully to hear President Obama say something important:

“I think it’s fair to say that if it hadn’t been for you guys, I might not be here and we wouldn’t be looking at this together.”

He said something very similar during his campaign for President in 2007.

“I’m here because somebody marched. I’m here because you all sacrificed for me. I stand on the shoulders of giants.” ~Speech, Selma Voting Rights March Commemoration in Selma, Alabama, March 4, 2007

Listed below is a timeline of important events of the Civil Rights Movement. These events culminated with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act in 1965. For each event a few books are listed, both fiction and non-fiction, that bring the events and people to life. Take a book walk through history to learn about these fascinating, determined, brave people who stood together so no one stood alone.


1954: Brown Vs. Board of Education was a landmark United States Supreme Court case. The Court declared state laws allowing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. It was a major victory and important turning point for the Civil Rights Movement. The decision by the Court was unanimous (9–0). Unanimous means all of the supreme court justices agreed.


Brown v. Board of Education a Fight for Simple JusticeRemember the Journey to School Integration

1955: The Lynching of Emmett Till

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African-American boy who was murdered in Mississippi in 1955 after allegedly offending a white woman in a grocery store. His killers were acquitted. The trial and acquittal drew attention to the long history of violent persecution of African-Americans in the United States. Emmett’s death became a rallying cry that helped people all over the country realize the critical importance of the Civil Rights Movement.


Midnight Without a Moon

1955-1956: Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a protest against racially segregated seats on the public buses in Montgomery, Alabama. It sounds very strange today, but back then it was actually illegal for a black person and a white person to sit next to each other on a bus. The bus riding rules up to this point stated that African Americans could not be hired as bus drivers, had to ride in seats at the back of the bus, and had to give up their seat to a white person.The boycott began when Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white person.


Rosa Parks: My StoryRosaThe Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott in PhotographsClaudette Colvin Twice Toward Justice12 Incredible Facts about the Montgomery Bus BoycottBack of the Bus

1957: Little Rock Central High School Integration

The Little Rock Nine was a group of African American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Even though the U.S. Supreme Court had already unanimously said in Brown v. Board of Education that all laws establishing segregated schools were unconstitutional, the students were initially prevented from entering the school. President Eisenhower then sent the 101st Airborne and the Arkansas National Guard to escort the students to school.


The Lions of Little RockThe Little Rock nine: a primary source exploration of the battle for school integrationThe story of the Little Rock Nine and school desegregation in photographsLittle Rock girl 1957 : how a photograph changed the fight for integration

1960: Greensboro, North Carolina Sit Ins 

The Greensboro Sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests against the segregated seating at lunch counters in restaurants. In Greensboro, North Carolina, four men sat down at the all-white lunch counter but no one would take their order. They sat quietly until the counter closed. The next day, joined by more people, they did the same thing. More people joined each day at more restaurants and in more cities. Sales at the boycotted stores went way down and gradually, the stores abandoned their segregation rules. Similar protests helped change segregation policies at libraries, beaches, parks, swimming pools and museums. When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 finally passed, it ordered desegregation of all public places.


Sit-in : how four friends stood up by sitting downFreedom on the MenuMake a ChangeThese HandsSeeds of Freedom

1960: Ruby Bridges New Orleans, Louisiana

Ruby Bridges was the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in Louisiana in 1960. Bridges and her mother were escorted to school by four federal marshals for the entire school year.


The Story of Ruby BridgesThrough My Eyes

1961: Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders were people who rode on buses to protest segregated seating. The United States Supreme Court had already ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional, but the law was not enforced. In protest, mixed racial groups rode the buses together to challenge the rules. The riders drew attention to the states that were not following federal law.


Night on FirePreaching to the ChickensThe story of the civil rights freedom rides in photographsShe Stood for Freedom

1963: Birmingham Children’s March

Birmingham Children’s March was a march by hundreds of school children in Birmingham, Alabama, May 2–5, 1963. The children left school and walked downtown to talk to the mayor about segregation. Many children were arrested. Fire hoses and police dogs were used to stop the march. This event compelled President Kennedy to publicly support federal civil rights legislation and led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.


The Youngest MarcherWe've Got a JobBirmingham 1963When the Children Marched

1963: March on Washington

The March on Washington took place in Washington D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to stand up for civil rights for African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. The march helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Voices from the March on WashingtonAs Good As AnybodyWe MarchI Have a DreamMarch On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the WorldMartin's Dream DayThe March on Washington Primary Source ExplorationThe Story of the Civil Rights March on Washington in PhotographsMarching for Freedom

1963: 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing occurred at the African-American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on Sunday, September 15, 1963. Four members of the Ku Klux Klan planted a bomb beneath the steps at the church, killing four little girls and injuring 22 others.


A Thousand Never EversThe Watsons Go to BirminghamBirmingham Sunday

1964: Civil Rights Act

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.


Glory BeThe Civil Rights Act of 1964 a Primary Source Exploration>Freedom SummerFreedom Summer

1965: Voting Marches & the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Selma to Montgomery Voting Marches were three protest marches along the 54-mile highway from Selma, Alabama to the state capital, Montgomery, Alabama. The marches were organized to support African-American citizens who wanted to exercise their constitutional right to vote. The marches contributed to the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, federal legislation that prohibits racial discrimination in voting.


The Story of the Selma Voting Rights Marches in PhotographsBlood BrotherTurning 15 on the Road to FreedomRevolutionLillian's Right to VoteGranddaddy's TurnBecause They Marched

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Classic /ˈklasik/ Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind. Ex. “a classic novel”

If you were alive in 1917 when Central Library was built, this is what one of the bookcases in the children’s section might have looked like.

Listed below are 50 books for kids published before 1917 that were on the shelves back then. These books are classics, having stood the test of time. They have been favorites for more than 100 years! Click on any book jacket to read the book right now! You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free! You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Tom SawyerAesop's FablesAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAnne of Green GablesThe Arabian NightsBlack BeautyThe Blue Fairy BookThe Call of the WildA Christmas CarolCinderellaGrimm's Fairy TalesGulliver's TravelsHans BrinkerHans Christian Andersen StoriesHeidiJack and the BeanstackThe Journey to the Centre of the EarthThe Jungle BookKidnappedThe Legend of Sleepy HollowThe Little PrincessLittle WomenThe Merry Adventures of Robin HoodNights with Uncle RemusOliver TwistPeter and WendyPeter RabbitThe Pied Piper of HamlinPinocchioPollyanna width=The Princess and the GoblinRebecca of Sunnybrook FarmRip Van WinkleRobinson CrusoeThe Secret GardenSnow WhiteThe Story of the Champions of the Round TableThe Story of the Three PigsThe Swiss Family RobinsonThe Tales of Mother GooseThe Nutcracker and the Mouse KingThe Three MusketeersThrough the Looking GlassTreasure IslandTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the SeaA Visit from Saint NicholasWhite FangThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Homework Help: U.S. States

Homework Help: U.S. States

More Homework Help

 

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols is all that and more. The title of this book could also have included, mottoes, capitols, flowers, birds, trees, sports teams, fairs and more. It is a one stop shop for factual details about each state. Listed below are more eBooks, Books, websites to help you write state reports for social studies.

“This Indiana State Flag rode into space with Hoosier astronaut Joe Allen during his November 1982 mission on the Columbia shuttle. Why do you think states have flags? Do you know the history of the Indiana state flag? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the state of Indiana, the Daughters of the American Revolution sponsored a competition to create a state flag. Respected Hoosier artist Paul Hadley of Mooresville submitted the winning design. In 1917 the Indiana General Assembly adopted his design.” 

More Indiana Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites:

Culture Grams States Edition Logo

Culture Grams: States Edition is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Choose a state to find up-to-date information for reports including: state symbols, climate, geography, economy, history, population, government, famous people, sports teams, & recipes.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks and eVideos. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

The Midwest and Great Lakes RegionThe Scary States of AmericaThe Scrambled States of America

Print Books:

50 States Our AmericaNational Geographic Beginner's United States AtlasDK State by State AtlasExplore the USA with 50 Fun Filled MapsGreat Lakes States CraftsOur 50 States a Family Adventure Across AmericaNational Geographic Our Fifty States The Handy State by State Answer BookUltimate US Road Trip AtlasUnited Tweets of AmericaUS Geography Through Infographics
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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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