Tag Archives: Social Studies

Homework Help: Black History

Homework Help: Black History

Heart and Soul

Sometimes history can be overwhelming for me. It’s hard to keep the people and places and dates straight. I really like Heart and Soul because the history unfolds like a story. In fact, the book is written like an old lady talking. It’s like listening to your Grandmother explain it.

This book shows how a country can change from laws that say a black person was property to having a black president. It explains how changes were slowly made to help make that happen. It doesn’t say the job is done, but it shows how we got to where we are today. And it has the BEST paintings. Author: Kadir Nelson

Read Right Now!:

Websites:

More Info Guides about Black History:

Books about Black History:

If you like reading about the story of America and African Americans try these::
Traveling Experience Miles Powerful
Crafts Woodson Moving Job
Marching Culture Come Color
Handy Harlem Sugar Courage

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Homework Help: Indiana

Homework Help: Indiana

INDIANA FACTS

Indiana It's My State

If you have Indiana homework this page will help you get started tracking down facts and finding information about Hoosiers, even the ones that aren’t that famous. The page is divided into five sections:

  • Facts
  • Images & Project Ideas
  • People
  • Landmarks
  • Stories Set In Indiana

Each section includes a list of books and websites. Pay special attention to the “Images and Project Ideas” Section – listed here are places to find Indiana photos online, pictures of Indiana artifacts and even instructions for drawing Indiana pictures.

Books:

Websites:


IMAGES & PROJECT IDEAS

Books

How to Draw Indianas Sites and Symbols Great Lakes States Crafts

Websites:


PEOPLE

Books:

Bill Peet Madam CJ Walker Major Taylor Ernie Pyle

INAuthorDatabaseLogo

Indiana University: Indiana Authors Database – A searchable database of the book, Indiana Authors and Their Books, published by Wabash College in 1949, 1974, and 1981. The encyclopedia covers nearly two hundred years of Indiana’s literary history (1816–1980).

Websites:

 

LANDMARKS

Books:

Websites:


STORIES SET IN INDIANA

The Bears of Blue River The Beef Princess of Practical County Bernie Macgruder and the Bats in the Belfrey Blossoms on the Roof
Chasing Orion Chrsitmas After All The Dark Didnt Catch Me A Girl of the Limberlost
A Halloween Scare in Indiana Help Im Prisoner in the Library Here Lies the Librarian Honey
Izzys Place The Mighty Miss Malone My Brother Abe A Place Called Freedom
Running Out of Time The School at Crooked Creek
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Black History: Scientists and Inventors

Black History: Scientists and Inventors

The Frog ScientistI wish all science books were written like this one! The Frog Scientist is the story of Dr. Tyrone Hayes who started out as a boy collecting frogs, turtles and snakes in the swamp near his home. Fast forward 20 years and Tyrone is a Harvard graduate studying frogs. He’s a frog scientist, just like he always wanted to be.

As you read the book you learn about how Tyrone became a scientist, but you also learn about how he does his research. You see pictures of Tyrone out in the wild collecting samples and inside his lab studying frogs under a microscope. Tyrone’s research is about the affects of pesticides on frogs. Pesticides are chemicals that farmers spray on crops to kill pests like insects or weeds. In particular, he studies atrazine, a chemical used to kill weeds. Reading this book just might make you want to follow the debate about whether or not atrazine should be used. According to Tyrone’s research, the chemical causes all kinds of problems in frogs…they can grow extra legs or even make a boy frog turn into a girl frog!

This book has fabulous pictures of frogs, frog parts & frog insides. There are also great pictures of Tyrone and his students in his lab or out in the wild collecting specimens. The pictures are all crisp and clear and full of color. I really liked the pictures inside the lab. I also liked hearing about being a scientist right from Tyrone. The author used Tyrone’s real words throughout the book. It was cool to read about a little boy who grew up to do exactly what he dreamed of doing. It’s also cool to read about someone that is really passionate about what they do.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about African American scientists and inventors. Here are two inventive contributions, both are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Madam C.J. Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower Sarah Breedlove Walker, better known as Madam C.J. Walker, was a central figure in the development of the African-American market for commercial beauty products. She developed a formula for hair growth and a steel straightening comb and ointment. Starting with door-to-door sales of these products, she built a business empire. Not only did the business bring her personal success, but it also opened up new job opportunities for African-American women as sales agents and Beauty Culturists.

Traffic Signal – Garrett Morgan worked to bring order to busy streets. In 1922 he observed an accident. After seeing the confusion, Morgan improved the stationary Stop and Go lights by adding a warning pause so that drivers knew the light was about to change. An African American, Morgan had difficulty promoting his ideas.

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black athletes, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.


Websites:

Biography in Context is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about African American scientists and inventors.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

National Georgraphic Kids George Washington CarverWhat Color Is My World?

Books:

Mae JemisonAfrican American InventorsBrilliant African American Scientists 9 Exceptional LivesBlack InventorsBlack Stars African American InventorsCharles DrewDaniel Hale WilliamsGarrett MorganGeorge Washington CarverInspiring African American Inventors 9 Inspiring LivesLewis LatimerMadam C.J. Walker Inventor and MillionaireTicktock Banneker's ClockUrban Biologist Danielle Lee

More Info Guides about Black History:


To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Homework Help: U.S. Presidents

Homework Help: U.S. Presidents

More Homework Help


Websites:

U.S. History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: U.S. Presidents is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about U.S. Presidents.​


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

An Illustrated Timeline of US PresidentsHail to the ChiefLives of the PresidentsSo You Want to be President?The New Big Book of US Presidents

Print Books:

50 Things You Should Know About US PresidentsEyewitness PresidentsHow the Executive Branch WorksLincoln and Kennedy a Pair to CompareOur Country's Presidents a Complete EncyclopediaSmithsonian The PresidentsThe Election Book The People Pick a PresidentTime for Kids Presidents of the United StatesUS Government Through InfographisWe Elect a President the Story of Our Electoral CollegeWhat Is the President's Job?White House Winners

Print Books – Presidential Families & Pets:

First Kids<Hot Dog! Eleanor Roosevelt Throws a PicnicMiss Lady Bird's WildflowersThe First PupWhat To Do About Alice?White House KidsWhat's the Big Deal About First Ladies?

Funny Stories about the Presidents:

Presidential misadventures : poems that poke fun at the man in charge Presidential Misadventures: Poems that Poke Fun at the Man in Charge – A rollicking collection of presidential poems shares lively facts about the misbehaviors of America’s commanders-in-chief.
Kid presidents: true tales of childhood from America's presidents : stories  Kid Presidents: True Tales of Childhood from America’s Presidents – Presents twenty stories featuring the United States presidents when they were children, including William Taft’s dance lessons, Lyndon Johnson’s classroom pranks, and Gerald Ford’s struggles with dyslexia.
First Mothers First Mothers – Profiles of the American presidents’ mothers reveal their achievements while sharing anecdotes and childhood stories, from Thomas Jefferson’s mother’s solo management of a plantation to Abraham Lincoln’s mother’s stint as a wrestler.
Did President Grant really get a ticket for speeding in a horse-drawn carriage? Did President Grant Really Get a Ticket for Speeding in a Horse-drawn Carriage? – Discusses facts and myths about American presidents, including if Washington cut down a cherry tree, if Lincoln walked twenty miles to school, and if Taft weighed more than an elephant.
The president's stuck in the bathtub : poems about the presidents The President’s Stuck in the Bathtub : Poems about the Presidents – A playful, poetic celebration of lesser-known presidential events and eccentricities reveals such examples as John Quincy Adams’ skinny-dipping forays in the Potomac and Herbert Hoover’s Chinese-language conversations with his wife, in a volume complemented by footnotes and an additional “Presidential Notes and Quotes” section. 10,000 first printing. Jr Lib Guild Premier.
Rutherford B., who was he? : poems about our presidents Rutherford B., Who Was He?: Poems about Our Presidents – Innovative rhymes about America’s 19th president while placing his achievements within the context of his time, incorporating short biographical details and presidential quotes.
The camping trip that changed America : Theodore Roosevelt, John Muir, and our national parks The Camping Trip that Changed America: Theodore Roosevelt, John Muir, and Our National Parks – Offers insight into the camping trip that President Theodore Roosevelt and naturalist John Muir took to the redwoods of Yosemite in 1903, during which the two men had experiences and conversations that eventually contributed to the establishment of national parks in the United States.
Hanging off Jefferson's Nose: Growing up on Mount Rushmore Hanging off Jefferson’s Nose: Growing up on Mount Rushmore – Lincoln Borglum was a young boy when his father, the great sculptor Gutzon Borglum, suggested to a group of South Dakota businessmen that he should carve the faces of four presidents into a side of a mountain as an attraction for tourists. But Mount Rushmore would never be finished by Gutzon. It would be his son who would complete the fourteen-year task and present America with one of its most iconic symbols.

Stories About Voting/Elections:

Libby and the Class Election Lillian’s Right to Vote Don’t Vote for Me President of the Whole Sixth Grade
Smek for President Marvin Redpost: Class President Class Captain Vote

FocusOnIndianaSmall

Benjamin Harrison – the President from Indiana

Benjamin Harrison Presidential SiteBenjamin Harrison Photo 250
1230 North Delaware Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Books Recommended by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

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Black History: Musicians & Singers

Black History: Musicians & Singers

More Homework Help

Sweethearts of Rhythm

The Sweethearts of Rhythm is the story of a real all girl band that traveled around the country in the 1930s and 1940s. The band was unusual because it was all girls and because it was integrated.

One reason the girls got this chance is World War II. A lot of men were fighting in the war so it was easier for a girl band to get gigs. Sometimes the band had trouble performing because the band was integrated. When the band played in the South they had to sleep on their tour bus because it was illegal there for black and white people to be in the same restaurant or hotel. Sometimes the girls had to wear disguises to hide the fact that their skin color was not all the same.

The author tells the story of the Sweethearts in poems. She uses the rhythms of jazz music in her poetry. Read the poems, look at the great pictures and then don’t forget to read the author’s note in the back.

From the 1870s to the 1950s, Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis served as the focal point of Indianapolis’s black community. The black population in Indianapolis surged in the early 1900s as blacks migrated to the city from the South. Indiana Avenue businesses included restaurants, saloons, grocery stores, clothing stores, hair stylists, barber shops, a hotel, and more. Some of the most well known businesses on the Avenue were the Indianapolis Recorder (a black newspaper) and the Walker Building (which housed a casino and theatre, offices, a beauty college, drugstore, and restaurant.) In the 1930s, the Avenue’s businesses were focused on food and entertainment. By 1940 there were more than twenty-five jazz clubs on the Avenue where both national talent and local legends played. (from The Indiana Historical Society 2011 Indiana Black History Challenge)

I wonder if the Sweethearts of Rhythm ever played there? Here is a movie poster of a different performer from the 1950s advertising a Rhythm and Blues show in Indianapolis. The poster is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Lula Reed Poster – Lula Reed began to demonstrate her singing ability in church in the late 1940s. With the help of well-known gospel singer Harold Boggs, Reed débuted with the Sonny Thompson Orchestra in 1951. Achieving two hits on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues Chart, she performed for audiences throughout the country. On one of these trips, she performed for African American audiences in Naptown, a nickname for Indianapolis, at the Rhythm and Blues Show in the late 1950s.

Listed below are more books, websites & databases that will help you learn about African American musicians and singers.


Websites:

Biography in Context is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about The Sweethearts of Rhythm and other African American Musicians.​


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

A Horn for LouisDuke EllingtonI'm Going to SingJazzJust a Lucky So and SoLil WayneRay CharlesTrombone ShortyWalk Together Children

Print Books:

Here are some more books that highlight African American music, composers, singers & musicians from slave work songs to spirituals to songs of the civil rights movement:

A Band of AngelsAin't Nothing But a ManAwesome African American Rock and Soul MusiciansBaby FloBessie Smith and the Night RidersDuke Ellington's Nutcracker SuiteElla FitzgeraldFree at LastHarlem's Little BlackbirdHow Sweet the SoundIn the Hollow of Your Hand Slave LullabiesIncredible African American Jazz MusiciansJazz A-B-ZJazz Age JosephineJazz Day the Making of a Famous PhotographJazz on a Saturday NightJosephine's DreamLike a Bird the Art of the American Slave SongLouis Armstrong King of JazzMister and Lady Day Billie Holiday and the Dog Who Loved HerNobody Gonna Turn Me RoundThe Voice That Changed a NationWhat Marian Sang

African American Music in Indiana

From the 1870s to the 1950s, Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis served as the focal point of Indianapolis’s black community. Originally called Indiana Street, the Avenue begins at the intersection of Illinois and Ohio Streets and extends northwest. While the Avenue was originally settled by German and Irish immigrants, by 1870 one-third of Indianapolis’s black population lived near Indiana Avenue. The black population in Indianapolis surged in the early 1900s as blacks migrated to the city from the South.

The Indiana Avenue businesses included restaurants, saloons, grocery stores, clothing stores, hair stylists, barber shops, a hotel, and more. Some of the most famous businesses on the Avenue were the Indianapolis Recorder (a black newspaper) and the Walker Building (which housed a casino and theatre, offices, a beauty college, drugstore, and restaurant.) In the 1930s, the Avenue’s businesses were focused on food and entertainment. By 1940 there were more than twenty-five jazz clubs on the Avenue where both national talent and local legends played. I wonder if the Sweethearts of Rhythm ever played there?

(from The Indiana Historical Society 2011 Indiana Black History Challenge)


More Info Guides about Black History:


To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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