Tag Archives: Social Studies

Homework Help: Pioneers

Homework Help: Pioneers

In American history, the time period know as the Old West is the time between the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and the last continental state, Arizona, being added to the Union in 1912 (Two states were added later, Hawaii and Alaska.) People living during this time period are well known for populating the land west of the Mississippi. Stories from this time period often recount the legendary deeds of explorers, trappers, and mountain men. One of them is William Frederick Cody, better known as Buffalo Bill. Buffalo Bill is one of the most well-known larger-than-life figures of the American West. He served for the Union during the Civil War, was a scout for the US Army, received the Medal of Honor in 1872, performed in shows depicting life on the frontier and founded Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

By reading about an event from the perspective of different people, you can get a more well-rounded idea of what that event or time period was really like. You can do the same thing by reading books that tell you about the different people, customs and events of a certain time period. Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the U.S. Civil War.

To give you a start looking at what life was like in the American West, here is a Conestoga Wagon, Hundreds of years ago, travelers depended on wagons and carriages just as we depend on our cars today. Made in Pennsylvania about 1803, this wagon hauled farm produce or machinery. As pioneers moved west, families used wagons like this one to move all of their family belongings and tools west of the Appalachian Mountains.

More Pioneer Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.


Websites:

Focus on Indiana

 

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: Pioneers a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about the American West, pioneers and the frontier.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about Pioneers and the American West is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read set in the time of the American West or “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Pioneer Non-Fiction:

Bad News for OutlawsDressing a NationDaniel BooneDonner Dinner PartyThe Donner PartyExplorers Trappers and PioneersGreat Pioneer ProjectsWild Women of the Wild WestPoptropica Wild WestWomen of the FrontierHow to Get Rich on the Oregon TrailYou Wouldn't Want to Be an American PioneerSeed By SeedLife as a PioneerLife on a Wagon TrainPainting the Wild FrontierThe Westward MovementYou Wouldn't Want to Live in a Wild West TownSkillet Bread, Sourdough Etc.Hornbooks and InkwellsTexas RangersWho Were the American PioneersVoices of the Western Frontier

Pioneer Fiction:

The Ballad of Lucy WhippleCaddie WoodlawnHattie Big SkyThe Last of the MohicansLittle House on the PrairieMay BThe Quilt WalkSarah Plain and TallThe Trouble with May AmeliaWoods Runner

Indiana Books & Websites:

FocusOnIndianaSmallAloneThe Bears of Blue riverThe Conners of conner PrairieThe Floating HouseLog Cabin in the WoodsMy Brother AbeOllie's Cabin in the WoodsA Place Called FreedomSalt a Story of FriendshipThe School at Crooked CreekWhere the River GrinsBlossoms on the Roof
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National Parks & National Forests

National Parks & National Forests

More Homework Help

The Camping Trip That Changed America is the story of a very important adventure in the great outdoors. In 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt asked naturalist John Muir to take him camping. Roosevelt was so ready to get lost in the woods he ordered all of his aids away. The two men hiked and camped alone in the redwoods of Yosemite. Muir talked about the geology and the animals and the things he felt endangered them. President Roosevelt watched and listened. When he returned to Washington, President Roosevelt got to work.

In 1905 President Theodore Roosevelt established the U.S. Forest Service. Their spokesperson is someone you might know – Smokey the Bear! Today the U.S. Forest Service is responsible for 154 National Forests and 20 National Grasslands.

The National Park Service was created on August 25, 1916, when President Woodrow Wilson signed the National Park Service Act. This act created the National Park Service to help manage national parks, battlefields, historic sites, and monuments. Today, the National Park Service is responsible for 59 National Parks and 78 National Monuments.

Indiana has 1 National Forest:

Indiana has 3 National Parks:

 

The eBooks, books, websites, activities and more on this page will help you learn about America’s stunning National Parks.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: National Parks is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about U.S. National Parks.​


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

Ranger Rick's National ParksYellowstone National ParkWhere Is Mt. Rushmore?Where is the Grand Canyon?The Grand Canyon

eVideo:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eVideos. Click on a link, enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive


Non-Fiction Printed Books:

Yellowstone MoranThe Camping Trip That Saved AmericaMountain ChefNational Parks a Kids' GuideA Weird and Wild BeautyThe 12 Most Amazing American Natural WondersNational Parks Guide USAOur Great Big Back YardWhat are the 7 Natural Wonders of the United StatesMy Book of AnimalsPark ScientistsBuddy Bison's YellowstoneGrand CanyonGrand Canyon National ParkGreat Smoky MountainsGreat Smoky Mountains National ParkYellowstoneYellowstone National ParkYosemiteYosemite National ParkDeath ValleyDeath ValleyDeath Valley National ParkEvergladesEverglades National ParkMount Rushmore

Printed Fiction:

The Missing Grizzly CubsSand Dune PonyThe Grand Canyon Burros that BrokeThe Everglades Poacher Who PretendedThe Mount Rushmore Face That Couldn't SeeThe Yellowstone Kidnapping That Wasn'tDanger in the NarrowsGlacier National Park Going to the SunGrand Canyon National Park Tail of the ScorpionGreat Smoky Mountain National Park Ridge Runner RescueMount Rushmore, Badlands & Wind Cave Going UndergroundOlympic National Park Touch of the Tide Pool Crack of the GlacierRocky Mountain National Prk Peril on Longs PeakYellowstone National Park Eye of the GrizzlyYosemite National Park Harrowing Ascent of Half DomeArches and Canyonlands National Park The Land of Standing Rocks
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Homework Help: Black History

Homework Help: Black History

Heart and Soul

Sometimes history can be overwhelming for me. It’s hard to keep the people and places and dates straight. I really like Heart and Soul because the history unfolds like a story. In fact, the book is written like an old lady talking. It’s like listening to your Grandmother explain it.

This book shows how a country can change from laws that say a black person was property to having a black president. It explains how changes were slowly made to help make that happen. It doesn’t say the job is done, but it shows how we got to where we are today. And it has the BEST paintings. Author: Kadir Nelson

Read Right Now!:

Websites:

More Info Guides about Black History:

Books about Black History:

If you like reading about the story of America and African Americans try these::
Traveling Experience Miles Powerful
Crafts Woodson Moving Job
Marching Culture Come Color
Handy Harlem Sugar Courage

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Homework Help: Indiana

Homework Help: Indiana

INDIANA FACTS

Indiana It's My State

If you have Indiana homework this page will help you get started tracking down facts and finding information about Hoosiers, even the ones that aren’t that famous. The page is divided into five sections:

  • Facts
  • Images & Project Ideas
  • People
  • Landmarks
  • Stories Set In Indiana

Each section includes a list of books and websites. Pay special attention to the “Images and Project Ideas” Section – listed here are places to find Indiana photos online, pictures of Indiana artifacts and even instructions for drawing Indiana pictures.

Books:

Websites:


IMAGES & PROJECT IDEAS

Books

How to Draw Indianas Sites and Symbols Great Lakes States Crafts

Websites:


PEOPLE

Books:

Bill Peet Madam CJ Walker Major Taylor Ernie Pyle

INAuthorDatabaseLogo

Indiana University: Indiana Authors Database – A searchable database of the book, Indiana Authors and Their Books, published by Wabash College in 1949, 1974, and 1981. The encyclopedia covers nearly two hundred years of Indiana’s literary history (1816–1980).

Websites:

 

LANDMARKS

Books:

Websites:


STORIES SET IN INDIANA

The Bears of Blue River The Beef Princess of Practical County Bernie Macgruder and the Bats in the Belfrey Blossoms on the Roof
Chasing Orion Chrsitmas After All The Dark Didnt Catch Me A Girl of the Limberlost
A Halloween Scare in Indiana Help Im Prisoner in the Library Here Lies the Librarian Honey
Izzys Place The Mighty Miss Malone My Brother Abe A Place Called Freedom
Running Out of Time The School at Crooked Creek
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Black History: Musicians & Singers

Black History: Musicians & Singers

More Homework Help

Sweethearts of Rhythm

The Sweethearts of Rhythm is the story of a real all girl band that traveled around the country in the 1930s and 1940s. The band was unusual because it was all girls and because it was integrated.

One reason the girls got this chance is World War II. A lot of men were fighting in the war so it was easier for a girl band to get gigs. Sometimes the band had trouble performing because the band was integrated. When the band played in the South they had to sleep on their tour bus because it was illegal there for black and white people to be in the same restaurant or hotel. Sometimes the girls had to wear disguises to hide the fact that their skin color was not all the same.

The author tells the story of the Sweethearts in poems. She uses the rhythms of jazz music in her poetry. Read the poems, look at the great pictures and then don’t forget to read the author’s note in the back.

From the 1870s to the 1950s, Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis served as the focal point of Indianapolis’s black community. The black population in Indianapolis surged in the early 1900s as blacks migrated to the city from the South. Indiana Avenue businesses included restaurants, saloons, grocery stores, clothing stores, hair stylists, barber shops, a hotel, and more. Some of the most well known businesses on the Avenue were the Indianapolis Recorder (a black newspaper) and the Walker Building (which housed a casino and theatre, offices, a beauty college, drugstore, and restaurant.) In the 1930s, the Avenue’s businesses were focused on food and entertainment. By 1940 there were more than twenty-five jazz clubs on the Avenue where both national talent and local legends played. (from The Indiana Historical Society 2011 Indiana Black History Challenge)

I wonder if the Sweethearts of Rhythm ever played there? Here is a movie poster of a different performer from the 1950s advertising a Rhythm and Blues show in Indianapolis. The poster is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Lula Reed Poster – Lula Reed began to demonstrate her singing ability in church in the late 1940s. With the help of well-known gospel singer Harold Boggs, Reed débuted with the Sonny Thompson Orchestra in 1951. Achieving two hits on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues Chart, she performed for audiences throughout the country. On one of these trips, she performed for African American audiences in Naptown, a nickname for Indianapolis, at the Rhythm and Blues Show in the late 1950s.

Listed below are more books, websites & databases that will help you learn about African American musicians and singers.


Websites:

Biography in Context is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about The Sweethearts of Rhythm and other African American Musicians.​


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

A Horn for LouisDuke EllingtonI'm Going to SingJazzJust a Lucky So and SoLil WayneRay CharlesTrombone ShortyWalk Together Children

Print Books:

Here are some more books that highlight African American music, composers, singers & musicians from slave work songs to spirituals to songs of the civil rights movement:

A Band of AngelsAin't Nothing But a ManAwesome African American Rock and Soul MusiciansBaby FloBessie Smith and the Night RidersDuke Ellington's Nutcracker SuiteElla FitzgeraldFree at LastHarlem's Little BlackbirdHow Sweet the SoundIn the Hollow of Your Hand Slave LullabiesIncredible African American Jazz MusiciansJazz A-B-ZJazz Age JosephineJazz Day the Making of a Famous PhotographJazz on a Saturday NightJosephine's DreamLike a Bird the Art of the American Slave SongLouis Armstrong King of JazzMister and Lady Day Billie Holiday and the Dog Who Loved HerNobody Gonna Turn Me RoundThe Voice That Changed a NationWhat Marian Sang

African American Music in Indiana

From the 1870s to the 1950s, Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis served as the focal point of Indianapolis’s black community. Originally called Indiana Street, the Avenue begins at the intersection of Illinois and Ohio Streets and extends northwest. While the Avenue was originally settled by German and Irish immigrants, by 1870 one-third of Indianapolis’s black population lived near Indiana Avenue. The black population in Indianapolis surged in the early 1900s as blacks migrated to the city from the South.

The Indiana Avenue businesses included restaurants, saloons, grocery stores, clothing stores, hair stylists, barber shops, a hotel, and more. Some of the most famous businesses on the Avenue were the Indianapolis Recorder (a black newspaper) and the Walker Building (which housed a casino and theatre, offices, a beauty college, drugstore, and restaurant.) In the 1930s, the Avenue’s businesses were focused on food and entertainment. By 1940 there were more than twenty-five jazz clubs on the Avenue where both national talent and local legends played. I wonder if the Sweethearts of Rhythm ever played there?

(from The Indiana Historical Society 2011 Indiana Black History Challenge)


More Info Guides about Black History:


To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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