Tag Archives: Sports

Indy 500

Indy 500

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The SpectacleThe Spectacle is a complete history of the Indianapolis 500. It includes a hundred year’s worth of memories from legendary drivers and races. It’s like you were in the pits yourself watching the drama unfold. Listed below are more eBooks & print books about the Indy 500 you can check out with your IndyPL Library card.

Websites:


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Indianapolis 500Indy CarsIndy RacingIndy Car RacingRace Cars Look BookRace DayThe Race Car BookIndy Cars 3Indy Cars 5Indy Cars 6Indy CarsThe Curse of the Ind 500Indianapolis 500 2Indy CarsRace CarRacing DriverMario AndrettiA J FoytDanica Patrick
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25 Olympic Books for Kids That Are Pure Gold

25 Olympic Books for Kids That Are Pure Gold

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Long-Armed Ludy is the story of Olympic athlete Lucile Godbold. Lucile competed in track and field events at the 1922 Women’s World Games. The Women’s World Games were held when the International Olympic Committee refused to include women’s events in the 1924 Olympic Games. I did not know that happened! I had never heard of The Women’s World Games before. Lucile was a trailblazer! It takes a lot of hard work and practice to be an Olympic athlete. It also takes a lot of money. Find out how Lucile made it to the games with a little help from her friends!

Listed below are more books, websites & databases that will help you learn about the history of Olympic competition and find out more about athletes like Lucile.

You can view some online images of Olympic Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis like this 2002 Winter Olympics Banner. “The mascots of the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics represented the land and culture of Utah and the American West. Inspired by images from ancient petroglyphs, Powder the Hare, Coal the Bear and Copper the Coyote were chosen as ideal icons for the 2002 Games.”

Printables, Websites & Activities:


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

The Boys in the BoatThe OlympicsOlympic ExpertInside the OlympicsA Passion for VictoryAmerica's Champion SwimmerBright Path: Young Jim ThorpeDream Big Michael Jordan and the Pursuit of Olympic GoldFreeze Frame Winter OlympicsHow to Train with a T Rex and Win 8 Gold MedalsJesse Owens Fastest Man AliveMassacre in MunichMiracle on IceNadia the Girl Who Couldn't Sit StillThrough Time OlympicsQueen of the TrackRun with MeSixteen Years in Sixteen SecondsSurfer of the CenturySwifter Higher StrongerThe Golden Girls of RioThe Wildest Race EverThe World's Greatest OlympiansTouch the SkyUndefeated Jim ThorpeWilma UnlimitedYou Wouldn't Want to Be a Greek Athlete
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Women’s History: Athletes

Women’s History: Athletes

More Homework Help: Women’s History

Girl Running

Girl Running is the story of Bobbi Gibb. When she was a little girl she was not allowed to run on her school’s track team. When she was by herself after school though, or on the weekends, Bobbi could run as much as she wanted, and she did! Believe it or not, as late as 1966 Bobbi was told she could not run in the Boston Marathon because it was considered a man’s race. At that time, a lot of people thought 26 miles was just too far for a woman to run. Bobbi ran in the race anyway and was the first woman to run the entire thing. She won the unofficial women’s division several times. Women were finally allowed to officially run in the Boston Marathon in 1972. Bobbi was a trailblazer and lead the way for all the female runners after her.

Listed below are several more stories about trailblazing female athletes.

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Anybody's GameGame Changers the Story of Venus and Serena WilliamsLong Armed LudieProudTrudy's Big SwimYes She Can SportsDirt on their SkirtsBasketball BellesQueen of the TrackDanica PatrickThe Golden Girls of RioSerena WilliamsWhen Wilma Rudolph Played BasketballThe Kid from Diamond StreetMermaid QueenFearlessTouch the SkyNothing But TroubleAmerica's Champion SwimmerWilma UnlimitedTillie the Terrible Swede
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Black History: Athletes

Black History: Athletes

More Black History

Marshall “Major” Taylor World Champion Cyclist 1899-1901 is the story of a young boy who grew up in Indianapolis over a hundred years ago. Despite living at a time when African-Americans were often denied basic rights, Marshall Taylor became a world champion cyclist. Marshall earned the nickname “Major” when he performed bicycle tricks dressed in a military style costume. When he was a teenager he stopped performing tricks and moved on to bicycle racing – and he was really, really good – world champion good! His story is inspiring because he persevered even when there were many people who didn’t want him to even be in a race, let alone win, just because he was African-American. Sometimes he rode fast just to get away from angry people chasing him!

In Indianapolis, we have the Major Taylor Velodrome, a world-class bicycle racing track named for this cycling great.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about more black athletes and the contributions they have made in their sport and in their communities.

The Muhammad Ali Boxing Game is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. It showcases the popularity of Ali. How many athletes have a game named after them? During the 1960’s boxer Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, was a positive role model for many African-Americans. Ali was more than a boxer. He expressed his political views on the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. In 1967, Ali was stripped of his world title due to his refusal to be drafted. After retiring, Ali collaborated with the United Nations to promote peace around the world.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

Biography in Context is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home. Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Marshall Taylor and other African American Athletes.​


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

Emmanuel's DreamI Am Jackie RobinsonLeBron JamesReggie Miller from DowntownSomething to Prove the Great Satchel PaigeStephen CurryA Nation's Hope the Legendary Joe LouisBlack History Makers AthletesDaring PlayFair Ball!Gabby DouglasGreat African Americans in SportsHenry Aaron's DreamJesse OwensJumpLeBron JamesNothing But Trouble the Stor of Althea GibsonOn the Court with Stephen CurryQueen of the Track Alice CoachmanRemember My Name Mo'ne DavisSerena WilliamsThe Champ the Story of Muhammad AliTouch the SkyWe Are the ShipWilma Unlimited

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

WeNeedDiverseBooks LogoTo get young people engaged, one of the things they need is to see themselves in books. It is important for all of us to see ourselves in books, because that encourages us to read in a different way and encourages us to write more.” ~ Dr. Jerrie Cobb Scott Founder of the African American Read-in #weneeddiversebooks

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Super Bowl

Super Bowl

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Super Bowl Chasing Football Immortality

The first Super Bowl was played on January 15, 1967 in Los Angeles, California. It was between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. This year, in 2018 the Super Bowl took place in Minneapolis, Minnesota on February 4, 2018. The game was between the Philadelphia Eagles (41) and the New England Patriots (33).

Listed below are more books about the history, legends and records of the Super Bowl.


Websites, Activities & Printables:


Books:

Use your indyPL Library Card to check out books at any of our locations, or check out e-books and e-audiobooks from home right to your device. Click on a book jacket below to request a book or download it. Need help? Call or ask a Library staff member at any of our locations, text a librarian at 317 333-6877, or leave a comment.

The Super BowlThe Super BowlThe Super BowlSuper Bowl and NFL recordsThe Ultimate Guide to Pro Football Teams
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