Mighty Girl Story: Emma and Julia Love Ballet

Listen to Emma and Julia Love Ballet A story that follows the everyday life of two girls, one a professional ballerina, the other a student, both of whom love ballet.


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

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Mighty Girl Story: Olivia

Listen to Olivia – Whether at home getting ready for the day, enjoying the beach, or at bedtime, Olivia is a feisty pig who has too much energy for her own good.


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

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Mighty Girl Story: Strega Nona

Strega Nona Listen to Strega Nona – When Strega Nona leaves him alone with her magic pasta pot, Big Anthony is determined to show the townspeople how it works.


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

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Mighty Girl Story: The Girl Who Learned to Fly

Read The Girl Who Learned to Fly

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

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Mighty Girl Story: Catching the Moon

Catching the Moon Listen to Catching the Moon – A picture book biography highlighting a pivotal event in the childhood of African American baseball player Marcenia “Toni Stone” Lyle Alberga, the woman who broke baseball’s gender barrier by becoming the first female roster member of a professional Negro League team.


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

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Mighty Girl Story: Amazing Grace

Story of the Day:
Listen Right Now! Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

Amazing Grace

Grace loves stories, whether they’re in books or in movies or the kind her grandmother tells. She acts out the most exciting parts of all sorts of tales…sometimes Hiawatha, or Aladdin, or Joan of Arc. There’s nothing that Grace enjoys more. Determined to play Peter Pan in the school play, African-American Grace meets opposition in her classmates, who insist that Peter Pan is a boy and white.

 


“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

More about Women’s History:


More FREE Online Reading:

Mighty Girl Story: I Am a Scientist

Read I Am a Scientist – A scientest talks about her job. She loves discovering new things!

“Stories, both real and imagined, show what girls can do. The stories of women’s lives, and the choices they made, encourage girls to think larger and bolder, and give boys and men a fuller understanding of the female experience.”

~National Women’s History Project

More about Women’s History:


More FREE Online Reading:

Zinio Directions

Overdrive Sample ImageRead full digital copies of favorite magazines on your computer, tablet or mobile device on Zinio. All you need to know is your library card number and PIN.

Your library card number is located on the back of your library card. When entering your barcode number leave no spaces or dashes between the numbers.  If you have forgotten your PIN, you can reset it: What’s My Pin?

Zinio requires the creation of two accounts – a library Zinio account to view the Indy Library’s collection and a free Zinio.com account to read magazines online or via the Zinio Reader app on a mobile device. Users can visit their device’s app store to download and install the Zinio Reader app to read magazines, or use a web browser to browse and check out new issues of Library magazines.

Set up an account and then choose a magazine to get started!

  • unlimited checkouts
  • unlimited loan period

 

 

American GirlAnimal TalesAskAsk en espanolBabybugBabybug en espanolClickCobblestoneCricketDigFacesHighlightsHighlights HelloHighlights High FiveHighlights High Five en espanolIguanaLadybugLadybug en EspanolMuseNickelodeon MagazineSpider

Tumblebook Library – Directions

Overdrive Sample ImageAnimated, talking picture books, story books, puzzles & games are available in the TumbleBook Library. All you need to know is your library card number and PIN.

Your library card number is located on the back of your library card. When entering your barcode number leave no spaces or dashes between the numbers.  If you have forgotten your PIN, you can reset it: What’s My Pin?

  • Animated, talking picture books; K-3
  • PCs, Macs, tablets and mobile devices running the free Kindle app; iPhone, iPad & Android
  • iPad Version – username: indypl password: libra