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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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Homework Help: Explorers

Homework Help: Explorers

More Homework Help

 

Do you think you have what it takes to be a trailblazer? In the Ultimate Explorer Guide, follow along as modern day explorers unearth ancient mummies, encounter wild animals and use the latest technologies in space travel. This book features explorers of all kinds: paleontologists, biologists, photographers, artists, conservationists, and more. 

An explorer is someone who investigates the unknown or unfamiliar in order to learn about it. The unknown can be geographic (a place) or it can be an experience or idea. Because they go where others haven’t, geographic explorers are often associated with certain personality traits like bravery, confidence and curiosity. Their adventures make great stories!

There are many well known explorers from history, especially from the period know as the age of exploration when the earth was not fully explored or mapped yet. This was the time of Columbus, de Soto, Magellan and many more. In the following centuries humans added the exploration of space. The first space explorers are well known too – Armstrong, Glenn, Shepard & Aldrin.

Use the resources on this page to learn about the explorers of the past as well as those today who continue to discover new frontiers on earth and beyond. You can also learn about the tools and technologies explorers have used to help them navigate to new and unexplored places.

The device on the right is called an octant. It is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. “An octant is a navigational tool that is similar to a sextant. It was used mostly to determine latitude at sea. It measures angles by observing the sun or stars and the horizon in reflecting mirrors. It is called an octant because the maximum angle it can measure is one-eighth of a circle, or 45°. This octant was made around 1800.”


Websites, Activities & Printables:

World History in Context LogoWorld History in Context: Age of Exploration is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? World History in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about explorers.

 

Biography in Context: Explorers is another database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about world explorers. Pick a name from their list to learn more about that explorer.​


IndyPLLibraryCard100Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive Logo

eBooks:

Lives of the Explorers Book JacketThe Quest for Z Book JacketI Columbus Book Jacket

Print Books:

Who Was First Book JacketEyewitness Explorer Book JacketAlexander the Great Book JacketAmerican Archaeology Uncovers Vikings Book JacketColumbus Book JacketDown the Colorado Book JacketExploration and Discovery Book JacketExplore the Most Dangerous Journeys of All TimeExplore with Lewis and Clark Book JacketWomen Explorers Book JacketExplorers Book JacketInto the West Book JacketMarco Polo Book JacketSylvia Earle Ocean Explorer Book JacketThe Plant Hunters Book JacketZheng He the Great Chinese Explorer Book JacketByrd and Igloo Book JacketA World of Her Own Book JacketConquistadors Book Jacket
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Identifying Leaves

Identifying Leaves

Have you been assigned making a leaf collection yet? If you have started your collection already but haven’t identified the leaves yet, here are some websites and books that will help you figure out the names of the trees your leaves came from.

Websites:

Pinterest Logo 25More Websites, Printables & Activities on the IndyPL Kids Pinterest Board: Leaves & Leaf Identification


Local Places to Find Leaves:

If you haven’t started your collection yet or want to add to what you already have, there are two great places you can go in Indianapolis to find leaves, Crown Hill Cemetery and Butler University. Both places have websites you can go to for maps and directions. They even label the trees so that you know for sure what kind of leaf you have. Put on some old shoes and go on a leaf hike. The sun is shining, you get a map, the trees are labelled – Easy A!

Crown Hill Cemetery Logo 700 West 38th Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208
Phone: 317-925-3800

Butler University 4600 Sunset Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46208
Phone: 317-940-9413 or 317-940-8302

101 Trees of Indiana 3300 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47803The “Indiana Veterans Memorial Mile” is a one mile walking trail around Indiana State University’s Memorial Stadium located at Wabash and Brown Avenues on the Historic National Road.


Books:

If you want to check out one of the libary’s tree identification books, don’t wait until the last minute to put one on hold. These go fast! And if you want to read about someone who feels your pain – try Gianna Z, she’s got a leaf collection due also, and if her disorganizatin and procrastination keep her from getting it done, she can’t run in the cross-country sectionals. She is feeling the pressure to find the leaves and identify them before it is too late.

Golden Guide Trees of North AmericaGolden Guide Trees101 Trees of IndianaNational Audobon First Field Guide to TreesEyewitness TreesStrange Trees and the Stories Behind ThemTrees of IndianaTell Me TreeTreeDeep Roots20 Ways to Draw a TreeSuper Simple Leaf ProjectsApple Trees to Cider Please
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Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Homework Help: Solar Eclipses

Cool Astronomy shows you 50 ways to enjoy the sky. A solar eclipse is when the moon  passes between the earth and the sun. When this happens the moon blocks the sun. If it is a total eclipse, the sun is completely covered up. If it is partial eclipse, only part of the sun is covered up.

One of the things you can learn in this book is how to watch a solar eclipse safely. This is really important to know because watching a solar eclipse incorrectly can hurt your eyes. Your retina can actually get burned by the sun. You can get “eclipse blindness”. “Eclipse blindness” can go away, or if it is bad enough, can be permanent. What makes “eclipse blindness” especially dangerous is that there are no nerves in the retina of your eye and you will not feel yourself being hurt. You will only notice later when you can’t see right, but the damage to your eye will already done. So please read Exploratoriuam: How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely. Observe, but do it the right way!

Here is a library program that will help you have fun learning about solar eclipses.

The Art of the Eclipse

Art of the Eclipse Class Various Branches in August & September School-age children are invited to join Art With a Heart for a program full of art and science inspired by the stars, sun, and moon. Schedule

You might also like learning about the Perseid Meteor Shower.


Video on the Sun & Viewing Solar Eclipses Safely:


Websites:

Science in Context: Eclipses is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Eclipses.​


Books about Solar Eclipses:

Solar and Lunar EclipsesEclipsesLooking Up Looking Up!

Space Stories:

Book jacket for Missile Mouse Rescue on Tankium 3The True Meaning of SmekdayThe Dead GentlemanAmulet The StonekeeperBook jacket for Zita the Space GirlBook jacket for Every Soul a StarBook jacket for Boom!CosmicThe Search for Wondla
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